On Demand Sessions (available until June 30th)

Discover Your Next Program: NISC Programming Awards of Excellence

Discover Your Next Program: NISC Programming Awards of Excellence

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Overview

Every day across the country, older adults visit to their local senior center to connect with friends, learn something new, discover how to stay healthy, give back to their community, and more. This year, fifteen senior centers have been recognized by the National Council on Aging’s (NCOA) National Institute of Senior Centers (NISC) with a 2019 Programs of Excellence Award for its recognition for innovative, creative, and replicable programs for older adults. This workshop will include brief presentations by multiple award winners. The programs are nominated, and winners are picked by a NISC Committee of senior center professionals. Awards are given to programs in seven categories and in one highlighted area related to a comprehensive Arts program. The categories include: • Community Development, Leadership and Intergenerational • Cultural Programs • Fundraising • Health and Wellness • Nutrition • Technology • Special Events • Highlighted Area: Arts Programming Senior Center programming is an important area for senior center professionals as they strive to offer the most relevant programming possible in their community. Since the Programs of Excellence Awards began in 2011, there have been 765 entries. This workshop will include approximately eight award winners who will present an overview of their award-winning program. Awardees will be selected and invited by January 31, 2020.
Agenda and Speakers

Maureen O'Leary

Improving Quality of Life and Social Connectedness Among Older Adults

Improving Quality of Life and Social Connectedness Among Older Adults

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Overview

Approximately one-third of older adults in the U.S. experience loneliness, and one quarter experience social isolation. Programs are needed to promote social connectedness among older adults. YMCAs across the country aim to improve the nation’s health and well-being through programs and activities that promote wellness. In 2019, YMCA of the USA, the national resource office for Ys in the U.S., established the Social Connectedness and Healthy Aging Grant Program to advance the Y’s healthy aging programming with a focus on increasing social connectedness among adults age 55 and over. A total of 36 Ys across the country received funding to increase older adult participation in traditional health and well-being programs and evidence-based chronic disease prevention programs. NORC at the University of Chicago conducted an evaluation of this program that explored whether older adults reported improvements in quality of life and social connectedness through Y engagement. The evaluation also identified factors that influenced older adults’ outcomes as well as successful Y programs and models. NORC conducted a retrospective post-then-pre survey with 1,800 Y program participants age 55 and older from 35 Ys, interviews with nine Y staff members and two partners, and focus groups with 20 Y program participants. The target audience for this session includes professionals who design, administer, or evaluate programs for older adults. Attendees will be able to: 1) learn about the impact of the Y’s programs on older adults’ quality of life and social connectedness; 2) describe factors that influenced older adults' outcomes in this study (number of interactions with the Y, types of engagement, longevity of relationship with the Y); and 3) hear about Ys’ lessons learned, which can inform future programs to improve quality of life and social connectedness among older adults.
Agenda and Speakers

Alycia Bayne

Heather Hodge

Increasing Access and Overcoming Barriers: Strategies to Connect Older Adults to Public Benefits, Healthy Food, and Supportive Services

Increasing Access and Overcoming Barriers: Strategies to Connect Older Adults to Public Benefits, Healthy Food, and Supportive Services

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Overview

This presentation will target professionals who engage in benefits enrollment and outreach efforts as well as those who are interested in increasing strategic partnerships and marketing efforts. Learn how to enhance engagement to older adults by utilizing senior specific marketing, meaningful referrals, age-friendly programming and targeted outreach efforts. Gain knowledge on the Greater Cleveland Food Bank’s (GCFB) mission to increase seniors' access to SNAP as well as healthy food supports within the community. GCFB’s strategic partnerships and data driven efforts are undoubtedly beneficial to helping older adults overcome barriers and access the vital supports they need to thrive. This presentation will demonstrate how to successfully utilize holistic outreach efforts along with successful aging partnerships to increase the well-being of older adults.
Agenda and Speakers

Katie Gedeon

Lisa Laditka

Innovative Programs at Senior Centers

Innovative Programs at Senior Centers

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Overview

Senior centers are critical community partners in meeting the needs and creating person-centered activities for Texas’s rapidly growing older adult population. This session explores how to bring innovative programming to your senior center. Attendees will learn about aging trends and statistics, get an overview of a recent HHS survey on a sample of Texas senior centers, hear about intergenerational programming, learn about three different innovative senior center programs and explore how to work with partners. Texas senior centers provide a large variety of interesting activities and programs for their participants. Highlighting best practice programs and learning how to connect with partners helps to meet the need of this population and saves center resources and staff time. Attendees will: -learn about the older adult population in Texas and their needs. -discuss creative programs from centers around Texas. -hear about how partners can help.
Agenda and Speakers

Claire Irwin

Holly Riley

Integrated Care for Dually Eligible Beneficiaries (Medicare Rights Center)

Integrated Care for Dually Eligible Beneficiaries (Medicare Rights Center)

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Agenda and Speakers

Derek Ayeh

It's All About Time: Saving Time Collecting Client Information

It's All About Time: Saving Time Collecting Client Information

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Overview

The Area Agency on Aging of Palm Beach, Treasure Coast serves a five county area in South Florida as a Benefits Enrollment Center. The Helpline housed within the Agency is the gateway to information and services. This helpline collects the initial client information and makes appointments for the BEC based on a online platform called Timetap. This platform is set up by staff as an algorithm of BEC counselors, site locations, and services needed to allow the helpline efficient scheduling as a nominal cost. Before the Timetap platform many clients would call into a program and leave a voicemail only to have a call back at a time that they were not available. To cut down on the missed clients, Timetap shows the availability of BEC counselors and the client chooses the time period they prefer. This cut down the 'phone tag' issues significantly and created an accountability measure for counselors and clients. This innovative technology has provided our local BEC program with the ability to monitor clients who show up for appointments, follow up with those who do not, help clients prepare for application assistance appointments, and run reports monthly while retaining client information as password protected. If you have a high volume of clients and collecting information in a uniform and efficient way, this system may be something to consider as the support and cost are exceptional.
Agenda and Speakers

Desirae Mearns

Masters in Aging: Empowering Older Adults and Building Community Connections

Masters in Aging: Empowering Older Adults and Building Community Connections

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Overview

Over the past two years, Winona Friendship Center (WFC) has been empowering its members by providing them with the opportunity to learn documentary filmmaking—from how to use equipment and software to the interviewing and production. The Masters in Aging program engages older adults and provides them with the tools and skills to create a high-quality documentary series, which aims to preserve and share community voices. The following presentation is intended for Senior Center Directors and Program Coordinators, and it will examine how WFC secured funding for the program; its extensive use of community partners (including area professions and the local university); the importance of university students as teachers; the benefits to the participants and community; and the projected growth of the program as it moves into the future. Participants gain the following insights: (1) How to select and apply for the right grants for your project (2) How to build community partnerships with agencies outside the realms of aging services (3) Recognizing that older adults have diverse skills and knowledge, and when it comes to engaging with their community, they are passionate about expanding those skills and knowledge (4) How to create innovative programs with wide-reaching impact for both older adults and the communities in which they live and engage.
Agenda and Speakers

Malia Fox

Laura Hoberg

Rapid Community Mobilization for Seniors during COVID-19

Rapid Community Mobilization for Seniors during COVID-19

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Overview

Target Audience Staff and volunteers from senior centers, other aging services, and municipal government. Anyone interested in building stronger community collaborations and public-private partnerships. Presentation Description (under 500 words) In March 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic hit the United States, the Ashland Senior Services Division and local community groups came together to develop solutions to help older adults and people with underlying health conditions stay safely at home. Thanks to established partnerships and a strong history of collaboration, Ashland was able to rapidly launch critical new services in the weeks after Ashland Senior Center was closed on March 13. This presentation will describe: • Immediate adaption of existing essential services, including information and referral support for older adults and their families and restructuring of the local Meals on Wheels program • Adopt a Neighbor Ashland, an innovative public-private partnership between a group of citizen organizers and the City of Ashland launched on March 28. (This program matches healthy volunteers under 60 with their at-risk neighbors for help with shopping and errands, and now includes cloth mask production and distribution.) • A Senior Phone Buddy program launched April 1 to reduce social isolation by matching seniors for daily check-ins and socializing by phone or video chat • Partnerships to help seniors with critical needs not currently met by existing organizations The presentation will also identify keys to success, including: • Working within the City of Ashland emergency operations system • Established partnerships among public entities, non-profits and businesses, which led to new alliances as the whole community adapted to the pandemic • Nimble, forward-thinking and flexible partners willing to take some calculated risks, such as finding creative ways to protect vulnerable seniors and minimize liability while rapidly deploying new volunteers As of this writing, programming and enrollment continues to grow, while rapid cycle improvement refines procedures. The presenters will share lessons learned in the first two months of deployment and consider the impact of these services for the duration of the pandemic and beyond. At the end of the workshop, the presenters will open it up for audience members to share innovative COVID-19 programming in their own organizations and communities, so that we can all learn from each other.
Agenda and Speakers

Isleen Glatt

Tonya Graham

Reframing Aging for Effective Advocacy

Reframing Aging for Effective Advocacy

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Overview

In your work as a service provider or advocate in housing, transportation, or health care, do you encounter ageist comments and negativity about older people? If so, this workshop will help you learn to communicate in ways that promote more positive views of aging and show how ageism hurts all of us. Let’s work together to change attitudes and embrace our shared journey across the lifespan. Session participants will have a chance to put what they’ve learned into action as they practice using the Reframing Aging tools on advocacy messages.
Agenda and Speakers

Laurie Lindberg

Tracey Colagrossi

Staying Relevant in a Changing Aging World

Staying Relevant in a Changing Aging World

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Overview

Community organizations are beginning to disappear. Memberships are slowly decreasing. As the older members pass away, new members are not taking their place. People are living longer and working longer. Trying to meet the needs of this changing aging population is becoming more difficult. Trying to develop a program that meets the needs of ages 55 - 95, along with the education, economic, and ethnic diversity is a struggle. One size fits all no longer works.Groups are searching for new ways to continue to attract the younger older, while still serving the needs of the older older. Learn how one organization's membership has increased to 66,000 and continues to reinvent the services offered to meet ever changing, challenging needs of the older adults.
Agenda and Speakers

Jerri Locke

Texas Innovations in Aging

Texas Innovations in Aging

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Overview

Texas has one of the largest older adult populations in the U.S. Texans 50 and older will reach over 11 million by 2030, with those ages 75-84 growing the fastest. As Texas’ older adult population grows, so do opportunities to enhance programs and supports serving them. This session will highlight noted trends and demographics of the older adult population and ways the state is creatively addressing older Texans' needs. Presenters will provide an overview of the Texas Health and Human Services Commission's (HHSC) Aging Texas Well initiative, along with many other innovative programs, services, and collaborations. This session is intended for all audiences, especially those interested in learning more about state-led initiatives on strengthening local community capacity to serve older adults. At the end of the presentation, participants will: have learned about innovative efforts implemented by Texas HHSC; be able to describe methods to identify aging trends; and have learned about elements of successful innovations.
Agenda and Speakers

Olivia Burns

Holly Riley

Texercise: Supporting Healthy Aging in Texas

Texercise: Supporting Healthy Aging in Texas

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Overview

Texas Health and Human Services’ Texercise initiative assists older adults in improving their health and quality of life. Texercise, an internationally recognized health promotions initiative, educates and engages people and communities in healthy lifestyle behaviors through a variety of programs, resources and tools. This session is relevant for professionals working with older adults and healthy aging. Session attendees will learn about the motivation behind creating Texercise, and the initiative’s development, evolution, use of partnerships, and future opportunities.
Agenda and Speakers

Chelsea Couch

Holly Riley

The Crime of the 21st Century: Elder Financial Abuse

The Crime of the 21st Century: Elder Financial Abuse

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Overview

Learn about a cutting-edge, first of its kind Center leading the nation in the prevention of financial insecurity and exploitation, protection of the most vulnerable elderly victims, and prosecution of financial crimes. The Elder Financial Safety Center is a unique collaboration between The Senior Source, Dallas County Probate Courts, and Dallas County District Attorney’s Office serving over 23,000 clients and victims with a financial impact of $110 million, 500 protected incapacitated adults 50+, and 1,500 indictments of elder abuse. Engage with others on how a Center can exist in any community using models designed by Center leadership; develop a comprehensive, coordinated services plan approach for your community; learn how to build strategic alliances, and understand how data can drive innovative solutions and sustainability.
Agenda and Speakers

Julie Krawczyk

Judge Brenda Hull Thompson

Alexis Goldate

The Intersection of Military Service, Aging, and the Veteran Experience

The Intersection of Military Service, Aging, and the Veteran Experience

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Overview

While new military inductees are typically some of the healthiest people in our society, both physically and mentally, many find themselves anything but healthy by the time they end their military careers. In fact, many find themselves coping with an accelerated aging process that combines natural aging with the service-related wear and tear on their bodies and minds. The rigors of military service begin in recruit training, where adequate sleep, a balanced diet, and healthy physical activity are coupled with exposure to environmental toxins on rifle ranges and gas chambers, extreme physical events such as speed marches and endurance runs in full battle gear, and extraordinary stress, in most cases. While this lifestyle is a necessary aspect of conditioning young people who are at their physical prime for the hardship they may face on deployment or even in combat, it is far from the typical experience of an 18 to 21-year old in college or working what’s considered a normal job. It is this difference in lifestyle and lived experiences between those who serve in the military and those who do not (with some exceptions being non-military yet equally rigorous occupations) that impacts the pace of the natural process of aging for both groups differently. A 2019 study, published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, found that Persian Gulf War veterans suffered chronic conditions — such as high blood pressure, heart attacks, diabetes, stroke, and arthritis — about 10 years sooner than non-veterans the same age. This results in lower quality of life, higher mortality rates, and shorter life expectancies, especially for women veterans. Compared to the overall population, veterans are more likely to be male, older, retired, widowed, educated, and living in the South, according to a report prepared by the LTSS Center in Boston. They also are more likely to report fair or poor health, limitations with activities of daily living, obesity, depression, and chronic conditions. This is despite the fact that there are not stark differences in financial wealth, and veterans pay less out-of-pocket for health care than civilians. This presentation will examine in detail the relationship between aging and military service. It will also cover the range of benefits, such as disability, pension, unemployability, and healthcare, that are essential to good quality of life for aging veterans, and how recent legislative efforts to reduce those benefits could impact aging veterans in the future if those efforts are successful. Finally, I will address the expanding role that caregivers have played as long term and extended care for aging veterans has increasingly shifted from institutional to home settings and how caregiver support, or lack thereof, will impact the care setting choices that aging veterans have presently and will have in the future.
Agenda and Speakers

Sherman Gillums

Social Security: Critical Services and Supports for Seniors and People with Disabilities

Social Security: Critical Services and Supports for Seniors and People with Disabilities

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Overview

Social Security touches the lives of millions of older Americans and people with disabilities. Our programs serve as a vital financial protection during times of hardship, transition, and uncertainty. As baby boomers age and an unprecedented number of Americans enter their most disability prone years, it is critical that SSA collaborate with aging organizations. Join us for a fun and interactive session about our key programs and new initiatives. Participants will learn about SSA’s work to prevent elder financial exploitation. 1. Participants will examine Social Security programs and how they play a vital role in financial protection to millions of older people; 2. Participants will understand the top areas of fraud and abuse while discussing best practices for preventing financial exploitation of seniors through partnership.
Agenda and Speakers

Lydia Chevere

Advancing Dementia Science: The Latest Updates in Research

Advancing Dementia Science: The Latest Updates in Research

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Overview

Alzheimer’s is not just memory loss. Alzheimer’s kills. In fact, Alzheimer’s disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States. As the number of older Americans grows rapidly, so too will the number of new and existing cases of Alzheimer's. By 2050, the number of people age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s dementia may grow to a projected 13.8 million, barring the development of medical breakthroughs to prevent, slow or cure Alzheimer’s disease. However, the Alzheimer’s Association is actively pursuing its vision of a world without Alzheimer’s by aggressively funding research. This includes providing funds to nearly every major thread in Alzheimer’s research for more than 30 years investing more than $160 million dollars across 450 best-of-field active projects in 25 countries. Today, there are unprecedented levels of philanthropic investment in addition to increased federal funding for research that may accelerate the pace of discovery to slow, stop, and prevent Alzheimer’s disease. In consideration of the vast investment in global research, where are we on the path to discover a cure? Before this presentation explores the landscape of Alzheimer’s and dementia science, Nelly Garcia will provide a brief overview of the differences between normal aging and Alzheiemer’s disease and dementia allowing participants to recognize the impact on the individual. Additionally, she will describe her first-hand experiences of the warning signs as a dementia caregiver, and providing participants a personal perspective. Finally, Debra Adams will provide a snapshot of the latest dementia science including results from the 2019 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference that included 6500 researchers from all over the globe. Overview will include identifying risk factors, risk reduction of cognitive decline, lifestyle-based interventions, early detection, current treatments, and an overview of clinical trials. After this presentation, participants will be able to: Recognize the differences between normal aging and the warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia Understand the role of the Alzheimer’s Association in advancing dementia science Identify the key areas of research including risk reduction, prevention, treatments, and clinical trials Understand how to get involved in advancing dementia science.

Know Your Rights! Older People and the ADA

Know Your Rights! Older People and the ADA

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Overview

This session focuses on key areas of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the benefits and protections this law affords to older people. Did you know that older adults may be entitled to reasonable accommodations such as magnification programs for a computer screen, or screen readers in order to help them maintain employment? Did you know that service animals may be permitted at work, in restaurants, and at doctors' offices for older adults with a qualifying disability? Did you know that employers, hospitals and medical providers are required to communicate information effectively by offering sign language interpreters and large-print documentation or other means, at no cost to the employee or patient? Did you know that movie theaters are required to offer assistive listening systems for people with hearing loss? Did you know that many older people qualify for accessible parking placards? This training session is the result of a collaboration between the Northeast ADA Center and the New York State Office for the Aging. Through the use of "real-life" scenarios and audience engagement, the session will be facilitated by skilled, experienced trainers who are a part of the ADA National Network. It will cover multiple aspects of accessibility and accommodation that are of particular relevance to older people and their support networks. Training participants will leave the training with an increased understanding of the ADA and how it applies to the everyday lives of older adults. Participants also will be able to give examples of the relevance of the ADA when providing services to older adults with disabilities.
Agenda and Speakers

Jeffrey Tamburo
Jennifer Perry

10 minute Chair Yoga Meditation

10 minute Chair Yoga Meditation

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Overview

Meet The National Institute of Excellence Technology Award Winner – Yoga with Yoni from the Kinship Care Resource Center, Jonesboro, GA.

Cooking with Co-Design: Creating Innovative Programs with Seniors at the Table - Coming Soon

Cooking with Co-Design: Creating Innovative Programs with Seniors at the Table - Coming Soon

Overview

For those of us who provide services to seniors in our areas, we know that there is no “shake and bake”, one-size-fits-all program to best meet the unique needs of each community. Human-centered design is one method of ensuring the programs we create will have a meaningful impact for the diverse populations we serve. For seniors experiencing food insecurity, the barriers to accessing enough nutritious food can be varied and overlapping and require new ways of approaching food assistance programs. As the nation’s largest hunger-relief organization, Feeding America embarked on a journey this year to support innovative program creation at four food banks across the country. With seniors from these communities at the helm, these groups of innovators tackled tough issues, learned from their peers, and piloted new programs. Join us to learn more about this innovation journey and promising practices for including seniors in your human-centered design work and sharing results across your networks.

Impacting the Health of Older Adults: It Takes a Village

Impacting the Health of Older Adults: It Takes a Village

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Overview

The United States Census Bureau projects that, for the first time in history, older adults (65 million) are projected to outnumber children age 13 and under (58 million) by 2034. By 2030, all of the nation’s baby boomers (74 million) will be 65 years old or older. The Centers for Disease Control predicts that this population of older adults will experience 49 million falls if the current trend of one in four older adults falling each year doesn’t change. Further, The CDC reported in 2018 that 50 billion dollars annually goes towards treating fall related injuries. In order to address this population health issue, expanding the availability of fall prevention interventions through partnerships across public, private and non-profit sectors is critical in order to achieve the health and well-being of the older adult population and applies the lessons learned from HealthyPeople 2020. The United Way of Tarrant County/Area Agency on Aging of Tarrant County is the recipient of three Administration for Community Living (ACL) grants to address fall prevention whose goals include increasing the number of low-income and minority adults with disabilities and adults over age 60 that complete evidence-based fall prevention programs. These grants are No Falls Partnership (NFP), Falls Infrastructure Expansion and Integration Enhancement (FIE2), and Falls Reduction Education and Empowerment (FREE). We will present an overview of these federally funded fall prevention grants and what has been accomplished. Key to the success of these grants is the work done by Sixty and Better, Inc., a nonprofit organization whose mission is to empower older adults to live with purpose, independence, and dignity. Through cross-sector partnerships with hospital systems, public health departments and community organizations, Sixty and Better has increased access to A Matter of Balance (AMOB) programs throughout Tarrant County. Sixty and Better has partnered with academic institutions to assist with the clinical training for healthcare students in order to increase access to fall prevention programs and help impact the next generation of health care providers in their interactions with older adults. We will discuss how these collaborative efforts have impacted participants in the offered evidence-based programming, but also how these collaborations have extended the reach of public health and health care organizations. Finally, we will review several sustainability strategies that keep the evidence-based programming available, including the formation of a nonprofit network hub, and the exploration of funding opportunities with health care partners.
Agenda and Speakers

Monique Barber
Donald Smith
Christina Bartha