June 11th - All Times EST

Breakfast & Boogie

Breakfast & Boogie 9:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Breakfast & Boogie

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Plenary: Let's Talk: Todays Digital Divide for Older Adults, Why Conventional Solutions Won't Bridge the Gap - 10:00 a.m. | Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Plenary 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Let’s Talk: The Digital Divide for Older Adults

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Overview

The last decade has seen a wide range of opportunities to provide broadband access to economically vulnerable communities. However, these efforts to “bridge the digital divide” have not necessarily included the essential socioeconomic structures to engage in a digitally responsible manner- “meeting people where they are.” The start of a new decade helps us to think collaboratively about the next one. The 2030’s will be a transformative decade for the U.S. population, with more than 77 million people over the age of 65, and a persistent digital divide between rich and poor. How can public-private partnerships, digital and tech, social service organizations, and county governments work together to increase digital adoption for older adults? How can accessing the world digitally match up with the things older adults believe to be important to their everyday lives?
Agenda and Speakers

Jamie Larsen

Tom Kamber

Pat Trank

Nicole Varner

Liz Hamburg

Nayana RenuKumar

A Conversation with retired MIPPA Directors 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

A Conversation with retired MIPPA Directors

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Agenda and Speakers

Kris Gross

Ann Kayrish

Darlene Sampson

Accessible Healthcare: Rights and Responsibilities Under the Americans with Disabilities
Act 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Accessible Healthcare: Rights and Responsibilities Under the Americans with Disabilities Act

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Overview

Disabilities are often thought of as physical, cognitive, psychiatric, or sensory impairments that an individual might have from birth, such as deafness or cerebral palsy. They also may be acquired as the result of an injury, such as a spinal cord injury from an accident or a traumatic brain injury sustained by a soldier in combat. Additionally, many people can also "age into disability." Regardless of origin, all of these individuals have rights to accessible healthcare under the ADA. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires equal access to medical care services and the facilities where the services are provided. Private hospitals or medical offices are covered by Title III of the ADA as places of public accommodation. Public hospitals and clinics and medical offices operated by state and local governments are covered by Title II of the ADA as programs of the public entities. Accessibility of doctors' offices, clinics, and other health care providers is essential in providing medical care to people with disabilities. Due to a variety of physical and communication barriers, individuals with disabilities are less likely to get routine preventative medical care than people without disabilities. Accessibility is not only legally required, it is important, medically, so that minor problems can be detected and treated before turning into major and possibly life-threatening problems.
Agenda and Speakers

Michael Richardson

Balance Training for Individuals with Dementia in the Adult Day Health Care Environment:
Successes & Challenges 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Balance Training for Individuals with Dementia in the Adult Day Health Care Environment: Successes & Challenges

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Overview

Evidence-based fall prevention programs for older adults with dementia have yet to be established. Over the past several years, we have experimented with ways to bring effective group balance training programs to Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) settings with the goal of improving balance and decreasing fall risk for individuals with dementia (IwD). With various grant support, our academic institution has provided staffing for these programs with the help of faculty and paid undergraduate and graduate health professions students. All students are trained in the unique interpersonal and therapeutic needs of IwD and coached in strategies for optimal communication, relationship building, and motor learning facilitation for this population. This presentation will share successes celebrated and challenges encountered in the quest for sustainable balance training programs in the ADHC environment. We have repeatedly demonstrated that IwD can and do enhance their balance with these programs, as demonstrated by improvement on a variety of physical outcome measures. We have piloted the Otago Exercise Program in the ADHC setting, as well as multi-component balance training programs. Multi-component programs include not only base of support manipulation (the basis for Otago), but added components of altering support surfaces for static and dynamic activities (e.g., foam and altered terrain), manipulating visual input (e.g., visual scanning demands and balancing with eyes closed), and integrating dual task demands (e.g., superimposed physical and / or cognitive tasks on static and dynamic balance activities). All programs have been universally well received by participants and staff. Common to each of our successful balance programs is a high level of challenge that ensures generous opportunity for loss and recovery of balance. This demands a level of staff supervision that has proven to be the biggest barrier in creating programs that facilities are willing and able to sustain over time. Our greatest success in facilitating sustained programming was realized only with the combination of a highly invested and motivated staff member, and a setting where the participants had relatively mild dementia (i.e., some ability to self-police for loss of balance safety). Through creative ADHC - University partnership, we are exploring opportunities to support ongoing programs with student volunteers / interns to help facilities supervise group balance training classes with IwD.
Agenda and Speakers

Julie Ries

Potty Talk Encouraged! Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder –
Incontinence Prevention for Older Women 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Potty Talk Encouraged! Mind Over Matter: Healthy Bowels, Healthy Bladder – Incontinence Prevention for Older Women

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Overview

Incontinence in older women is a widespread but rarely discussed problem. Urinary and/or bowel incontinence affects over 60% of community-dwelling older U.S. women (14 million). Incontinence has a hugely negative impact on quality of life and is a significant cause of depression, isolation, falls, caregiver burnout, hospitalization and nursing home placement and costs society over $30 billion each year. Like many health issues affecting older adults, incontinence is common, but not normal and a new evidence-based intervention from Wisconsin has shown dramatic lasting improvement in its trials along with increased skills and self-efficacy in managing both bladder and bowel health. Attendees will learn about the three-session evidence-based workshop is led by only one, two-day trained Leader for women over age 50 who are either currently experiencing incontinence or want to prevent ever experiencing it. Attendees will also learn the research behind the program, the amazing results, and the enormous demand for the program from the aging network in Wisconsin, public health, physical therapy and health care arenas and what it will take to get licensed and staff and/or volunteers trained to bring this highly popular and effective program to your community. This session is appropriate for evidence-based health promotion coordinators, senior center directors, area agencies on aging, the aging network, social service providers and health care.
Agenda and Speakers

Shannon Myers

Developing Community Partnerships to Create Programmatic Impact for Individuals with
Dementia and Their Caregivers 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Developing Community Partnerships to Create Programmatic Impact for Individuals with Dementia and Their Caregivers

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Overview

Presented by: Megan Rowe, MPS, Care & Support Manager, Alzheimer's Association Tonya McDaniel, MS, CIG, Education Supervisor, Family/Intergenerational Learning, The Dallas Zoo Target Audience: any professional looking to enhance program accessibility for individuals with Alzheimer's or dementia and their care partners Description: The number of Americans living with Alzheimer's is growing - and growing fast. An estimated 5.8 million Americans, or 1 in 3 seniors, have Alzheimer's disease, and this number has increased 145% since 2000. As the number of older Americans grows rapidly, so too will the need for communities to come together to be responsive to the unique needs of individuals with dementia. One method to address these needs and to increase awareness and support in the public sphere is to develop innovative community partnerships that provide accessible programming specific to the needs of individuals impacted by Alzheimer's disease. If you are looking to improve the health and wellness of older adults, increasing accessibility and support for individuals with dementia should be on the forefront of your mind. So how exactly can you influence community partners to create new opportunities to engage individuals with dementia without breaking the bank and increasing your own bandwidth? During this presentation, Megan Rowe, will focus on the deeper implications of Alzheimer's disease in the community and programmatic impact on affected families. By examining disease implications and reviewing examples of successfully implemented programs, learners will gain a stronger understanding of programmatic considerations needed in the public sphere to support Alzheimer's families. Additionally, this presentation will provide examples of program designs, strategies for addressing potential barriers, and ideas for limiting costs and professional bandwidth through the use of volunteers and developing strategic partnerships. Lastly, Tonya McDaniel, will share her real life case study of developing Wild Gatherings at the Dallas Zoo, created in partnership with the Alzheimer's Association. This program is designed specifically for those in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease and their care partners, while also sharing her own strategies to overcome barriers, surprising outcomes she has encountered, why her organization decided to support this new endeavor, and how it broadened her depth of expertise. After this presentation, learners will be able to: Describe the implications of Alzheimer's disease on an individual and the community Explain programmatic considerations and benefits for individuals with dementia and their care partners Limit strain on professional bandwidth by leveraging volunteers for programmatic impact Develop strategic partnerships to provide meaningful programming for individuals living with Alzheimer's disease and dementia.
Agenda and Speakers

Tonya McDaniel

Megan Rowe

Senior Center Innovation in the Face of Crisis 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Senior Center Innovation in the Face of Crisis

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Overview

Senior Centers are critical lifelines to their seniors in normal times. During a pandemic, they become even more important. During this session, we'll discuss examples of amazing programs and services created and delivered by truly inspirational senior center personnel, all with the goal of helping their seniors get the nutrition and socialization that they need. We'll also talk about some tools to help you get your own virtual offerings up and running now or in the future.
Agenda and Speakers

Chris Hamilton

Falls Prevention Referral Pathways & Puzzles: How to Stay on Your Feet while Navigating
the Pathway Puzzle! 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Falls Prevention Referral Pathways & Puzzles: How to Stay on Your Feet while Navigating the Pathway Puzzle!

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Overview

The target audience for this presentation is falls prevention partners, including area agencies on aging, public health professionals, health care providers, and community organizations. The goal of this presentation is to share what has been learned from initiating and implementing falls prevention referral pathways in two states. We will share our successes, challenges, and lessons learned to support other falls prevention partners who are planning on implementing referral pathways to community-based evidence-based falls prevention programs, A Matter of Balance and Tai Chi for Arthritis and Fall Prevention. You will have the opportunity to hear how two states have developed pathways with different types of community and health care partners. Last year, the North Carolina Center for Health & Wellness (NCCHW) presented on its unique partnership with Mission Health Partners (an ACO) and regional Area Agencies on Aging (AAA) and our efforts to develop a falls risk intervention pathway into evidence-based falls prevention programs (EBFPPs). The NCCHW manages NC's statewide resource center of EBFPPs, data management, quality assurance, and provides support in scaling community-based programs through the AAA network and other community partnerships. As the NCCHW heads into the last six months of a 3-year Administration for Community Living grant, we will provide an update on how we have learned to be creative and flexible in the face of challenges, what we have learned through our partnerships, and how we have overcome barriers to make successful connections between health care providers, patients, coalitions and data. Michigan State University Extension (MSUE) is half-way through a 3-year Administration for Community Living, Falls Prevention Sustainable Systems grant and has been exploring sustainable partnerships with a variety of unique referral partners. These referral partnerships include a managed care organization, primary care provider clinics, ophthalmologist clinics, fire departments, the Michigan State University Rural Residency Program, and a home care and hospice agency. We will provide strategic pathways to create referral partnerships and challenges we have overcome along the way. MSU Extension will share the benefits of using a tool like MSU Extension Rx for Health referral pads as a referral pathway and explore future opportunities for adopting an electronic referral pathway. Important key components and concerns to consider when structuring an electronic referral pathway will be shared.
Agenda and Speakers

Ellen Bailey

Carlee Wasik

Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Full Steam Ahead! Receiving Referrals and Sharing Evidence-Based Program Impact
Through the Health Information Exchange 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Full Steam Ahead! Receiving Referrals and Sharing Evidence-Based Program Impact Through the Health Information Exchange

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Overview

Working within Maryland's new Total Cost of Care initiative, the Maryland Living Well Center of Excellence (LWCE) is documenting how evidence-based programs (EBPs) improve health status, reduce overall healthcare costs and assist older adults and people with disabilities to remain at home. LWCE is working with the state's Health Information Exchange (HIE) to receive direct provider referrals to evidence-based programs. LWCE staff utilizes motivational interviewing to assess Social Determinants of Health gaps, link individuals to needed services, and enroll them in group or one-on-one EBPs. This direct referral has dramatically increased uptake of EBPs and other AAA services and closes the referral loop to the referring provider. Participant engagement/enrollment/completion of EBPs is shared with the physician, as well as utilization of services. Senior center directors, benefits enrollment specialists and evidence-based program coordinators will learn how to connect with state HIEs to demonstrate the value of EBPs and community services.
Agenda and Speakers

Sue Lachenmayr

Leigh Ann Eagle

Self-Management and Nutrition Classes for People Living with HIV/AIDS 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Self-Management and Nutrition Classes for People Living with HIV/AIDS

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Overview

Founded in 1988, during the peak of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, Open Hand Atlanta has been providing home-delivered meals and nutrition education to low-income, home bound individuals with HIV/AIDS as well as seniors and those with kidney failure, heart disease or diabetes who cannot cook for themselves. As the largest community-based provider of medically-tailored meals in the Southeast, we prepare and deliver nearly 5,000 meals daily to eighteen counties across Metro-Atlanta. Guided by our mission, "We cook. We deliver. We teach. We care," our meals and nutrition education, which include individual counseling and group classes, help eliminate knowledge barriers to healthy food access by teaching people about the connection between food choices and overall health, and giving them tools for providing healthy meals for themselves on a limited budget. Open Hand has been providing individualized Medical Nutrition Therapy to people living with HIV since 1994 and have seen this population age and develop nutrition-related chronic disease. Through our clinic partnerships, we have expanded our programming with this population to include group education such as Cooking Matters and Chronic Disease Self-Management Education classes. Through these classes, we have reached even more people living with HIV/AIDS who are over 60 years old. It was in 2011 we became trained on the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) which we have seen positive outcomes from initiating this program with this population. We have plans to expand to the Positive Self-Management Program in the future. In this session, we will address the history, demographics, health concerns, nutrition needs, and stigma that affect people who are living with HIV/AIDS and who largely identify as LGBTQ. Age is known to have a substantial impact on mortality associated with HIV and infections. Research has demonstrated that age has a major influence on the pattern of comorbid conditions. Now that HIV infected persons are living longer, they also experience long term toxicity from medications and age associated comorbidities that can be appropriately addressed through evidenced based programming. We will discuss the importance of cultural humility that encompasses all of these topics. We will also highlight how this work is assisting with Ending the Epidemic initiatives on a national and local level. All audiences can benefit from this session. 
Agenda and Speakers

Aleta McLean

Laura Samnadda

Growing Change: Updates on State Falls Prevention Action Plans from North Carolina and
Washington State 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Growing Change: Updates on State Falls Prevention Action Plans from North Carolina and Washington State

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Overview

The target audience for this presentation is falls prevention partners at all organization types, including area agencies on aging, higher education, public health and community organizations. The goals of this presentation are to share what has been learned from the continued development and implementation of state falls prevention action plans in two states. We aim to inspire, educate and provide resources to falls prevention partners who are looking at creating and implementing their own state level falls prevention plans, and share the successes and pitfalls that we have experienced in this process. In 2019, falls prevention champions from North Carolina and Washington state presented their different approaches to developing a state-level older adult falls prevention plan. This included diverse methods of bringing stakeholders together to uncover high priority areas and develop next steps. Now these states are one year further into their plan creation and implementation, and have new lessons learned and successes to share with falls prevention partners. In North Carolina, following a strategic planning retreat in April 2019, an action plan steering committee and three workgroups were identified to develop the next 5-year NC Falls Prevention Coalition action plan. The workgroups have been meeting since August 2019 to wrestle with the priority areas established at the retreat and to identify how each work group's particular perspective could inform the priority areas and contribute to cross-cutting themes. The steering committee met in November 2019 to combine all of the work group goals and objectives into one master list that were finalized with concrete action steps to produce a final 5-year action plan in Spring/Summer 2020. We will share the successes and challenges of this process, what we have learned about action planning with volunteer workgroups, and how to be flexible in leading a planning process! In Washington state, workgroups that were formed around the action plan strategy areas have met regularly since March 2019. They have accomplished several of the forty-eight action plan goals, and made significant progress towards nearly half of the total goals. Progress has brought corresponding challenges, including sustaining workgroup momentum and testing new methods of engagement. The WA State Department of Health produced a year-end progress report for the state Falls Prevention Coalition. Creating a cohesive report required a process of blending outcomes from dozens of stakeholder organizations. Lessons from this experience provide excellent learning opportunities for falls prevention partners in other states who are engaged in designing or implementing action plans.
Agenda and Speakers

Ellen Bailey

Ingrid Bou-Saada

Carolyn Ham

Busting Myths About the Senior Nutrition Program 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Busting Myths About the Senior Nutrition Program

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Overview

The OAA provides the authorizing legislation for the senior nutrition program. Did you know that there is a lot of misconceptions about the program and the flexibility written into the law to allow a vibrant program that engages older adults and meets the nutrition and health needs of older adults? This flexibility allows State and local level to administer the program in a way that best meets the needs of seniors in their communities. The senior nutrition program provides basic food security, a model for healthy eating, and engagement in nutrition education. During this session, you will gain basic understanding of the Act. You will hear about some common misconceptions. You will hear examples about how colleagues across the network are addressing declining congregate participation, perceptions of the congregate program, increasing access to nutrition programs by healthcare, increasing access to food assistance such as SNAP and evidence-based programming through the nutrition program. There will also be time for sharing and questions and answers.
Agenda and Speakers

Judy Simon

Paul Bennett

Bingocize®: An Evidence Based Health Program to Improve Quality of Life and Promote
Community Engagement 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Bingocize®: An Evidence Based Health Program to Improve Quality of Life and Promote Community Engagement

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Overview

Health promotion programs designed to improve physical, psychosocial, and cognitive benefits have the potential to reduce health care costs and improve quality of life for older adults. To that end, we strategically combined bingo, exercise, and health education to create an innovative group-based program (Bingocize®) and found significant improvements in older adults' social engagement, functional performance, health knowledge, and cognition. Bingocize®, paper-based and mobile app versions, are led by trained facility staff and can include an intergenerational component. Meeting the Administration for Community living's criteria for falls prevention programs, senior centers, long-term, and assisted living facilities across the US and other countries use the program. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the development, implementation, and benefits of Bingocize®. Allison Goforth, Program Director for the Partners in Care Foundation in San Fernando, California, will describe her experiences implementing the program and the many benefits gained by participating older adults.
Agenda and Speakers

Jason Crandall

Allison Goforth

UPSLIDing Towards Connection: A Senior Center Program That is Reducing Social
Isolation 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

UPSLIDing Towards Connection: A Senior Center Program That is Reducing Social Isolation

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Overview

Loneliness, isolation, and depression have growing prevalence and devastating health impacts in older populations. According to the AARP, over one third of adults over the age of 45 are lonely. This number rises with increased economic vulnerability. Often caused by compounding factors, such as physical health limitations and bereavement, loneliness prompts a downward cycle of mental and physical decline. Community organizations, such as senior centers, are well suited to intervene in this public health crisis. This presentation outlines implementation strategies of the Utilizing and Promoting Social Engagement to Combat Isolation Loneliness and Depression in the Elderly (UPSLIDE) program. Through case-based and programmatic information, the audience will learn replicable details about the program structure and ways to overcome challenges. UPSLIDE addresses the barriers that prevent individuals from being socially engaged. The program components include individual assessment and counseling, therapeutic chat groups, social engagement assistance, transportation assistance, and resource connection. Although a non-traditional setting for mental health services, the program's placement within the Tallahassee Senior Center (TSC) brings many benefits to older individuals and the community at large. TSC, offering 180+ activities each month, fosters ease of program access, exposure to peers, and many opportunities for meaningful engagement beyond the program. Program evaluation data finds that 73% of participants are now participating regularly in TSC offerings other than UPSLIDE. Outreach efforts aimed at increasing referrals, have helped health care and aging services professionals become more aware of the pervasiveness of social isolation. Multiple sectors are better able to address this matter in their clients/patients through collaboration with UPSLIDE. A combination of Florida Blue Foundation grant funds, city in-kind contributions, volunteers, and community partners make this program possible. Collaborative, multi-sector efforts that support components such as promotion and transportation assistance are key. The hybrid clinical, recreational, and social wellness UPSLIDE program targets those 50 and older with limited access to mental health services. Many participants who enter the program have a history of depression and childhood trauma. UPSLIDE provides them with a sense of belonging. It reinforces that their circumstances are survivable and improvable. The therapeutic chat groups are the primary entryway into the program. These groups combine curative group factors of universality, altruism, and interpersonal learning with a fun and safe setting for relationship building. Participants speak openly about their struggles. Sharing provides participants the opportunity for supportive interchange and reinforcement of positive coping. Activities help ease participants into the group, build social skills, stimulate insight, and highlight personal strengths. Individual counseling typically takes a non-pathological approach, focusing on addressing barriers to wellness and interpersonal factors that influence success in social situations. These interventions work; 87% participants report feeling physically and mentally healthier since joining UPSLIDE. It is well documented that experiencing feelings of social disconnectedness can lead to physical, cognitive, and emotional decline. The UPSLIDE program is improving older adults' quality of life, fostering friendships, and increasing participation in activities. As our communities age, we must utilize innovative collaborations and mental health services that can improve social engagement among older adults.
Agenda and Speakers

Nicolette Castagna

Melanie Lachman

Strategies to Engage and Retain Partnerships in Evidence-Based Programs for Rural
Communities 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Strategies to Engage and Retain Partnerships in Evidence-Based Programs for Rural Communities

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Overview

Target Audience: Evidence Based-Program Coordinators; Senior Center Directors • Description: According to n4a’s 2017 survey of area agencies on aging (AAAs), 93% of AAAs implement evidence-based programs focused on health promotion and disease prevention. Partners, especially in rural communities, play an essential role in implementing these programs—hosting workshops or serving as peer leaders across the country to inspire, motivate, and engage older adults and adults with disabilities in achieving their individual health goals. This session will highlight strategies-such as a Faith Based Initiative- utilized by Elder Options, -an area agency on aging in Florida, to recruit, engage and retain community partners for evidence-based programs in rural communities. Elder Options will also highlight the collaboration with the State of Florida Department of Elder Affairs who developed a steering committee of community partners to increase the number and participation rates for Fall Prevention evidence based workshops in three rural counties. Best practices, lessons learned, and challenges for recruiting, screening, engaging, and retaining community partners will be shared. • Goal: This session will highlight strategies used to increase evidenced based health promotion and disease prevention workshops in rural communities. • Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to describe the role of community partners in implementing evidence-based programs in rural communities. 2. Participants will be able to describe strategies for recruiting and screening community partners. 3.Participants will be able to describe strategies for engaging and supporting community partners. 4. Participants will be able to learn about resources to support their work in this area.
Agenda and Speakers

Katina Mustipher

Socialize, Think, Move, Eat: A Community-Based, Comprehensive Lifestyle-Enriching
Program to Reduce Alzheimer's Risk 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Socialize, Think, Move, Eat: A Community-Based, Comprehensive Lifestyle-Enriching Program to Reduce Alzheimer's Risk

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Overview

This brain & body healthy-aging symposium is designed to introduce a life-enriching, evidence-based, multi-modal program developed to promote well-being while reducing an individual's risk for cognitive decline. This program has been easily implemented in community-based senior centers and retirement communities. Attendees will learn about the “new science of the aging brain” and the six important lifestyle components; social engagement, mental stimulation, physical activity; healthful nutrition, stress management and memory-enhancing sleep practices that promote neuroplasticity and build brain (cognitive) reserve. This lifestyle can significantly reduce the risk of age-associated memory impairment (AAMI), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD).  This symposium is aimed for directors and program coordinators of community and senior centers, managers and activity directors of retirement communities, and all others interested in the latest advances in understanding the critical role lifestyle plays in life-enrichment, social engagement, healthy aging, and risk reduction of AD and all-cause dementia.  More than 200 drug pharmaceutical and biologic therapeutic trials designed to prevent or treat AD-related dementia (ADRD) have failed in recent years. Lifestyle is now recognized as the one, evidence-based, risk-reduction intervention that has a realistic potential to slow the tsunami of this devasting disease.  The presenters will highlight how risk reduction for AAMI, MCI, AD, and VaD can be accomplished in a socially engaging, fun and rewarding style by implementing a certified-instructor led, structured, six component program. In addition, the symposium will highlight ongoing, community-based research designed to augment the evidence supporting the link between healthy lifestyles and positive outcomes.  The symposium presenters have expertise in neurology and psychiatry, applied research in lifestyle components of healthy brain aging, social gerontology, program development, community implementation and the benefits accrued to sponsors. 
Agenda and Speakers

Paul Bendheim, MD

Carol Zernial, MA

Ben Brock, MS

Chelsea Stillman, PhD

Alvaro Pacual-Leone, MD, PhD

Workshop: FEMA/ACL Ready Seniors Workshops - Emergency Preparedness for Organizations that Serve Older Adults 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. | Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

FEMA/ACL Ready Seniors Workshop – Emergency Preparedness for Organizations that
Serve Older Adults (4 hours) 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

FEMA/ACL Ready Seniors Workshop – Emergency Preparedness for Organizations that Serve Older Adults (4 hours)

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Overview

The Ready Seniors Workshop grew out of a recognition that older adults frequently suffer disproportionately during disasters. The majority of the victims of the 2017 California wildfires were over age 70, and older adults accounted for more than 70% of the deaths as a result of Hurricane Katrina, while people 60 and older only accounted for 15% of the population. Increasingly, frail older adults with complex health issues live alone in the community, far from their relatives and caregivers. An older adult’s dependency upon service providers for basic necessities and psychosocial support often increases his/her vulnerability to the impacts of major disasters, when not only is the senior impacted, but these critical services also are disrupted. FEMA Region II and the Administration for Community Living have partnered to address this disparity through this workshop, which is aimed at helping organizations that provide critical support services to senior citizens in their communities to plan ahead so they will be better positioned to assist older adults during an emergency. The workshop typically consists of presentations in the morning (by FEMA, ACL and other federal and/or local agencies), followed by a scenario-based discussion in the afternoon to allow attendees the opportunity to share experiences and good practices. Since 2018, more than a dozen Ready Seniors Workshops have been conducted, preparing over 400 attendees. FEMA and ACL will partner together to conduct the Ready Seniors Workshop at the NCOA 2020 Age + Action Conference. Given the structure of the workshop, we request a ninety (90) minute block of time, in order to allow for time for presentations by FEMA and ACL and for a tabletop exercise. The workshop will be part of the overall series that FEMA and ACL have been leading, and a copy of the Executive Summary of Discussions for the Ready Seniors Workshop Series will be emailed to workshop attendees after the conference.
Agenda and Speakers

Devin Kerins

Rhonda Schwartz

Calder Lynch

Jean Bennett

Greg Olsen

Becky Preve

Boosting Contributions at Meal Sites: Insights from a Pilot Program 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Boosting Contributions at Meal Sites: Insights from a Pilot Program

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Overview

You may have looked at contributions at your site and wondered how you might be able to increase them. Perhaps you may have wondered what others are doing across the country to address the issue of contributions. In this session, we cover these topics and much more.
Agenda and Speakers

Kaitlyn Moberly

Judy Simon

Elana Safran

Jill Hall

Reap Rewards with Self Directed Teams 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Reap Rewards with Self Directed Teams

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Overview

Reap Rewards with Self Directed Teams (SDT). This long-used business approach can become a capacity building innovation in community based and non-profit organizations. CEOs, coordinators, and program leaders will understand the SDT model can expand their own and agency capacity, using self directed teams. Concepts are applicable for staff development, volunteers and others engaged with an agency. Participants will assess organizational readiness with discussion on 6 areas that matter. They will learn to recruit wisely with 3 techniques that target their approach. They will connect appropriately with strategies which forge a lasting bond between agency, staff and community volunteers. Session participants will consider the challenge (and perhaps, anxiety) of letting trained staff and volunteers tackle meaningful projects and significant work. Nothing to lose but agency productivity, increased capacity, team accomplishments and the satisfaction of those who are YOUR critical human resources.
Agenda and Speakers

Christine Beatty

Adherence to Referrals from Healthcare Providers to Attend Disease Prevention
Management Programs Among African American and Hispanic Men with Chronic Conditions 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Adherence to Referrals from Healthcare Providers to Attend Disease Prevention Management Programs Among African American and Hispanic Men with Chronic Conditions

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Overview

Background: Evidence-based programs to prevent and manage chronic conditions are recognized complements to the current healthcare system. Often, healthcare providers work with community-based organizations to engage patients in the clinical setting and link them to community programming through referrals. However, less is known about the proportion of healthcare referrals that result in program attendance, especially among populations that less frequently attend evidence-based programs. This study identified factors associated with being referred to a disease prevention/management program by a healthcare provider, as well as the adherence to such referrals, among African American and Hispanic men age 40 years and older with one or more chronic conditions. Methods: Data were analyzed from a national sample of 1,982 racial/ethnic minority males collected using an internet-delivered questionnaire. A multinomial logistic regression model was fitted to assess factors associated with disease program referrals and referral adherence within the past year. Results: On average, males were age 56.59 (±10.02) years and self-reported 3.99 (±2.02) chronic conditions from a list of 19 conditions. Approximately 58% were African American and 42% were Hispanic. About 9% of participants were referred to a disease prevention/management program but did not attend, whereas 13% of participants attended a disease prevention/management program after being referred. Men of older ages were less likely to attend a program after being referred (OR=0.98, P=0.008). Men with more chronic conditions (OR=1.10, P<0.001), those who take more medications daily (OR=1.18, P<0.001), and those with a hospitalization in the past year (OR=1.94, P<0.001) were more likely to attend a program after being referred. Those who felt more engaged by their physician during visits (OR=1.08, P=0.004) and believed their conversations with physicians high quality and included joint decision making (OR=1.09, P<0.001) were more likely to attend a program after being referred. Conclusion: Findings suggest the importance of patient-provider interactions for non-clinical disease prevention/management programs, especially among minority males with complex disease profiles. Efforts are needed to educate patients and providers about meaningful conversations, which may enhance adherence to referrals from healthcare providers. Additionally, community-based organizations that deliver programs are encouraged to work closely with healthcare providers to develop accurate messaging and feasible referral processes.
Agenda and Speakers

Matthew Smith

Reducing Caregiver Burden Through Evidence-Based Programs 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Reducing Caregiver Burden Through Evidence-Based Programs

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Overview

This initiative leverages the strong collaboration, expertise and commitment of the Maryland Living Well Center of Excellence (LWCE), the state's aging network, Johns Hopkins Geriatric Workforce Enhancement Program, Maryland Department of Aging and the Alzheimer's Association to shared goals to empower older adults, caregivers and their families through evidence-based programs. EBP coordinators, senior center directors and benefits enrollment specialists will learn about tools and marketing strategies to recruit caregivers into EBPs; how to connect with other state and local organizations to share resources; and, utilizing expanded data collection of caregiver burden, connect caregivers to additional services as needed. LWCE is working with physician groups to identify, refer and engage caregivers, especially those who are caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease into workshops. Caregivers and family members are screened to identify potential gaps in nutrition, financial support, medical conditions, social support, in-home care, environmental assistance and health and wellness activities.
Agenda and Speakers

Leigh Ann Eagle

Sue Lachenmayr

Growing Human Connection: How Meals on Wheels Programs Combat Social Isolation and
Loneliness in Older Adults 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Growing Human Connection: How Meals on Wheels Programs Combat Social Isolation and Loneliness in Older Adults

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Overview

Social isolation and loneliness are growing concerns for the aging population. Social isolation among older adults is associated with an extra $6.7 billion in Medicare spending each year. With access to the home on a daily basis, Meals on Wheels programs are better able to identify isolated and home-bound clients where other services may not be able to reach this population to the same degree. The human connection that Meals on Wheels provides is core to success of this program. During this session, you will learn about both the traditional and innovative approaches for increasing human connection and combating loneliness that Meals on Wheels programs deliver regularly. This presentation is ideal for individuals and organizations working with or hoping to work with their local Meals on Wheels programs. The goal of this session is for participants to understand what is happening locally to serve homebound clients and to identify key action steps for getting involved. This interactive session will allow for us all to explore different models including lessons learned in implementation and barriers to scalability. We will discuss at least four models for addressing social isolation and loneliness for homebound clients. Insights into delivering traditional Meals on Wheels approaches such as friendly visiting and pet assistance will be shared. Then, we will investigate innovative approaches that are being piloted and tested for scalability such as a technology-enabled access to a virtual senior center and expansion. You will discover some of the cutting edge and innovative approaches programs are using to expand their reach and impact in older adults’ lives.
Agenda and Speakers

L. Carter Florence

Christopher Lim

Falling into Prevention: Pharmacy's Critical Role in Reducing Fall Risk 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Falling into Prevention: Pharmacy's Critical Role in Reducing Fall Risk

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Overview

In response to escalating concerns and statistics related to falls among seniors in Ohio, evidence suggests that pharmacists can make a difference in falls prevention. Pharmacists can evaluate fall risk through self-assessments, medication regimen review for high risk drugs, and recommend therapy modifications. Pharmacists are another valuable community-based resource allowing patients to live healthy and longer lives in the community. This presentation will focus on three efforts in the state of Ohio to engage pharmacists in their important role in falls prevention. The target audience for this presentation would be any higher education institution, State Unit on Aging (SUA), Area Agency on Aging (AAA), community pharmacists, health systems, or community organizations interested in working with pharmacists on fall prevention. Attendees will learn about innovative ways to connect and develop fall prevention partnerships with pharmacists. The Ohio Department of Aging partnered with pharmacies across the state to recognize Medication Safety Awareness Week with medication review events and awareness campaigns. A toolkit was created and shared with pharmacies to assist with event and campaign implementation. Pharmacies were connected with AAA’s to promote other fall prevention resources available in local communities. This effort resulted in partnerships with several national pharmacy chains. Two colleges of pharmacy in the state of Ohio have developed innovative programs to engage pharmacy students in evidence-based fall prevention strategies. The Ohio Northern University Raabe College of Pharmacy created their Falls Prevention Program (FPP) to address medication and home safety as it relates to falls while giving their students the opportunity to gain experience working directly with older adults. Their FPP partners with an independent senior apartment community and a skilled nursing facility to reach high-risk seniors. In the FPP, students work with faculty members to provide home safety education and a medication review and consultation. Patients receive home safety equipment and recommendations based on their medication review. Additionally, the FPP coordinates educational fall prevention events and outreach efforts throughout the community. Since inception, the FPP has impacted nearly 200 seniors. This initiative was recognized by the National Association of County & City Health Officials with a Model Practice Award in May 2019. The University of Cincinnati’s James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy developed a student-led falls prevention program targeting underserved independent senior communities. The educational programming focuses on three main areas of fall prevention: reducing trip hazards, high-risk medications that can cause falls, and teaching strength training exercises. Displays to demonstrate common hazards and home safety measures are used to educate older adults. Comprehensive medication reviews are conducted with each patient and identified risks are discussed. Students demonstrate exercises to improve strength and balance. The program is routinely evaluated through pre and post surveys for both students and patients.
Agenda and Speakers

Kristen Finley Sobota

Tia Gulley

Katherine Hirschy

Kelly Reilly Kroustos

Kendra Hall

Everybody Learns: Using Student Led Research Projects to Enhance Senior Center Program
Evaluation 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Everybody Learns: Using Student Led Research Projects to Enhance Senior Center Program Evaluation

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Overview

Over the past 15 years, Center in the Park (CIP), a nationally accredited senior center in Philadelphia, has cultivated relationships with academic partners. Through these collaborations, CIP has strengthened its capacity to implement and sustain evidence-based health promotion programs and strengthened its evaluation capacity. The first part of this presentation will share lessons learned and best practices for engaging in academic collaborations. The second part of the presentation will highlight a recent successful collaboration. Most recently, CIP has been engaged with Developing Researchers who Improve Healthcare Value and Equity (DRIVE), a collaboration between Thomas Jefferson University. DRIVE is an intensive 8-week summer internship which provides minority health profession students with an exceptional well-rounded experience in implementing research that improves the care of underserved populations. DRIVE includes didactic and experiential training, with learning supported by applied learning through research and community-based health promotion activities at Center in the Park. Each summer (2017-2019), CIP welcomed a cohort of DRIVE students who engaged in a variety of on-site activities designed to increase students’ knowledge of senior centers and of older adults’ strengths and challenges, and to challenge any pre-conceived notions of ageism that students may hold. CIP serves older adults age 55+ and 93% of participants are African American. Students gained exposure to working in a community based-setting and learn strategies for effectively communicating with and conducting outreach with African American elders. Examples of students’ activities included observing health promotion and evidence-based programs, attending presentations by CIP staff on different program areas, and assisting with facilitating larger events. Students also have the opportunity to provide input on health promotion programs. For example, last summer’s cohort was invited to share ideas for enhancing outreach. One of the main features of the program is the completion of a research project at CIP under the mentorship of CIP staff. In summer 2018, the students collaboratively worked on a research project involving surveying CIP participants (N= 50) to better understand how participation in CIP programs and activities impacts health and well-being. The data collected was then analyzed at TJU and shared with CIP to inform future programming. In summer 2019, DRIVE participants conducted a focus group with CIP participants to explore how senior center participants describe their motivation for engaging in healthy activities and behaviors. The results again informed CIP programming. DRIVE is effectively a “win” for all involved, as everybody learns. DRIVE students gain valuable community-based experience working with older adults, while Center in the Park is able to undertake meaningful mini-research projects to inform and enhance programming.
Agenda and Speakers

Renee Cunningham

Feeding the Desert: A Collaborative Approach to Address Senior Hunger 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Feeding the Desert: A Collaborative Approach to Address Senior Hunger

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Overview

As the population of older adults age 65 and older continues to grow, there are some health concerns brought on as a result of older adults living in areas known as “food deserts” and the affordability of fresh produce. Good nutrition is a key factor for older adults to maintain their well-being, independence, healthy lifestyle, and short-term recovery from an illness or an injury. Many Georgians live in these food deserts, which results in potential food insecurity. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, one third of the state of Georgia is a food desert meaning there are a lack of grocery stores with reasonably priced wholesome foods within a mile of their residence (CDC, 2016). The official U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) definition of the term includes any census tract with a 20 percent or greater poverty rate, and where a third or more of the residents live more than one mile away from a supermarket. As a result, older adults living in these areas find it difficult to afford fresh, nutrient-dense foods. Many do not have adequate transportation, or have health conditions that prevent them from traveling outside of their communities. Food insecurity impacts a person’s health, well-being and quality of life- which could also contribute to multiple diseases, and increase medical costs and hospitalizations. One innovative solution to addressing this issue is called “Feeding the Desert”. The initiative focuses on providing seniors living below the poverty line with access to fresh produce, nutrition education and alternative shopping resources on a biweekly base. Fulton County Department of Senior Services and the Friends of Mills Inc., (a nonprofit organization) collaborated on a feeding the desert pilot program in 2019. Twenty community businesses partnered with Fulton County to address food insecurity in the senior population. The partnership allowed for funds to be generated through a silent/live auction. Fifty three percent of the total funds raised from the program is currently providing seasonal fresh fruits and vegetables on a biweekly bases for up to 6 months to 73 seniors. In addition, a monthly nutrition education class by a registered dietitian is being conducted, and transportation is being provided to these classes by a community partner. Fulton County is the largest municipality in the state of Georgia. Fulton County Government’s Department of Senior Services owns and operates four senior multipurpose facilities, strategically placed throughout the County. The implemented collaborative approach involved utilizes nonprofit organizations, local business, and faith based organizations. Incorporating this formula into the department’s philosophy of fewer residents experiencing hunger, and more vulnerable residents maintaining their independence, has increased supporters, sustainable inter-generation partnerships, an increase in the well-being of seniors, and cost saving for the department. Access to good nutrition and nutrition education are key factors for older adults to maintain well-being.
Agenda and Speakers

Sonia Foster

Kimberly Rose

Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Boomer Wellness: Where Health Prospers and Friendships Grow 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Boomer Wellness: Where Health Prospers and Friendships Grow

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Overview

In this presentation, the Executive Director and a staff member from the Aging & Wellness Institute (AWI) will explain how to develop and sustain a full service, progressive, Baby Boomer-focused community wellness center. Learn how they carved out a niche environment for active "Boomers" who desire to take their health and fitness to the next level. Learn how the results from an annual member survey helped a small non-profit shift gears, and transform into a thriving non-traditional senior-specific gym, in a 60+ population-dense area of Florida in just three short years. The presentation will highlight how to leverage resources, community partnerships, and member talents to deliver evidence-based Falls Prevention (A Matter of Balance) and Exercise (Enhance Fitness), as well as additional age-specific exercise, yoga, and nutrition education to local seniors. This presentation will also highlight the social connections and volunteer opportunities that have resulted from this type of environment.
Agenda and Speakers

Samantha Nevins

Stumbling into a Community of Practice 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Stumbling into a Community of Practice

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Overview

Falls are the leading cause of injury-related hospitalizations and deaths for Texans age 65 and older. A growing number of older adults fear falling, and as a result, often self-limit activities and social engagements. Falling is not an inevitable result of aging! The North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council (NCTTRAC) is an organization designed to facilitate the development, implementation, and operation of a comprehensive trauma care system based on accepted standards of care to decrease morbidity and mortality. The Trauma Service Area (TSA-E) for the NCTTRAC is comprised of the following Texas counties: Collin, Cooke, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Erath, Fannin, Grayson, Hood, Hunt, Johnson, Kaufman, Navarro, Palo Pinto, Parker, Rockwall, Somervell, Tarrant, and Wise. Members and organizations of NCTTRAC reached out to leaders within their communities committed to finding a productive way to providing a network of services for older adults to help decrease the number of falls and severity of falls in order to maintain independence in their homes. Through this alliance, the NCTTRAC Older Adult Fall Prevention Coalition (Coalition) was established July 2017. The Coalition established a community of practice in an attempt to reduce injuries sustained from older adult falls through education, partnerships, and policy changes. Communities of practice are groups of people who share a passion for something that they know how to do and who interact regularly to learn how to do it better. 
Agenda and Speakers

Courtney Edwards

Paulette Golden

Streamlining National Senior Center Accreditation 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Streamlining National Senior Center Accreditation

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Overview

Join NISC Accreditation leaders to discuss the streamlining of the subsequent accreditation process. We will review the accreditation process, benefits, and the move to streamline the accreditation process. Details about the changes made to the process, the ability to submit notebooks virtually and reduced costs will be presented.
Agenda and Speakers

Christine Beatty

Scott Harlow

Elizabeth Bernat

Maureen O'Leary

Influencing the Influencers 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Influencing the Influencers

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Overview

How do you communicate the value of your senior center? Is your senior center on the radar of decision makers, funders, influencers, donors and prospective participants? What is the context or setting when you talk to people about your senior center? Are you preaching to the choir? Social media deems certain accounts or people to be influencers based on the number of followers they have. Influencers are more than social media. Every community has influencers, people who can affect change. Grassroots influencers need to know and believe in the value of the local senior center. Few senior center leaders think they have time to invest in developing the support of influencers, but time is running out. If your senior center is not on their radar, something else is. Big or small; senior center leaders can and should cultivate the influencers. Know who influencers are. Who awards grants? Who writes checks? Who are the decision makers? Who is in the room when community strategies are discussed and the course of events are set in motion? Who in your organization is an influencer? Are you an influencer? Are you or your surrogates at the table or in the room? Who is in the meeting behind the meeting? Who is announcing collaborations and partnerships? Getting on their radar should be affordable, doable, strategic, consistent, succinct, and can be a combination of subtle and bold. Are your senior center programs viewed as necessary or just nice? What is your senior center’s footprint? Can you prove your senior center’s impact? Do the influencers see your mission as relevant to the community? Where are private and public funds being directed? Who makes those decisions? Identify the reasons or thinking that fuels these funding choices. How does that way of thinking hinder or help your senior center? Both presenters are seasoned senior center professionals currently working in senior centers. They will provide their perspective, replicable methods, and actionable steps.
Agenda and Speakers

Beverly Ferry

The Rural Problem: Reality or Perspective 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

The Rural Problem: Reality or Perspective

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Overview

Offering Evidence Based (EB) and other programs in rural areas has always been a challenge. The purpose of this workshop is to closely examine the beliefs and realities about bring evidence-based program to rural America. We will examine this from four views; state units on aging, academic implementation research, the experiences of one rural state and insights in how different EBs can be modified or use in a different mode. A representative from ADvancing States, previous called the National Association of State Units on Aging, will talk about an initiative in which approximately a dozen state units identified concerns and challenges. This will be followed by Veronica Yank MD who is heading a nation-wide National Institutes of Health implementation research project to bring an internet-based best practice caregiver program to rural areas. She will describe the project, its learning collaborative and present learnings to date. Don Smith AAA Director from Terrance County Area Agency on Aging (Texas) will discuss how evidence-based programs are utilized in rural Texas. Jennifer Raymond, co-chair of the Evidence Based Leadership Collaborative, will give an overview of how existing EB programs can be formatted and used in rural areas. The final participants will be you, the audience who will have adequate time to interact with our speakers.
Agenda and Speakers

Kate Lorig
Jennifer Raymond

Benefits Screening as a Building Block for Relationships with Health Care Entities 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Benefits Screening as a Building Block for Relationships with Health Care Entities

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Overview

Looking for new ways to connect with health care providers and payers? Hear from two AAAs that have tested offering benefits screening as a service to connect with health plans and Accountable Care Organizations. Learn about their experiences, the value proposition they developed, and how you can try this in your community. We’ll also discuss conflict of interest issues AAAs need to be aware of and policies and procedures that can address them.
Agenda and Speakers

May Bryan

Brad Lazernick

Karol Tapias

Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative: A Rural Falls Prevention Program for Older Adults 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative: A Rural Falls Prevention Program for Older Adults

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Overview

The Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative (OHAI) is a program of the Reynolds Section of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine at The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center focused on providing health education to older Oklahomans across the state. OHAI has five offices that serve five regions of the state that can be defined in rural vs urban terms: Oklahoma City (urban), Tulsa (urban), Enid (rural), Durant (rural), and Lawton (rural) and has served over 220 Oklahoma communities since 2012. OHAI has had great success with uptake of Tai Chi Quan: Moving for Better Balance (TCBB) for fall prevention, particularly in rural communities and also began delivering Staying Active and Independent for Life (SAIL) in 2018. OHAI classes are taught by staff instructors as well as older adult volunteers. OHAI has grown our volunteer corps with 76 older adult volunteers teaching fall prevention classes in 2019 at all 5 offices across the state. We present TCBB and SAIL enrollment and participant completion rates by paid staff instructors versus volunteer instructors. In 2018-2019, 771 older Oklahomans participated in a fall prevention class, 636 in TCBB and 135 in SAIL. 34% (N=216) of TCBB participants completed at least 17 of 24 sessions (75% of sessions), and 38% (N=51) of SAIL enrollees completed at least 17 of 24 sessions. Aggregate completion rates for TCBB and SAIL programs were higher among paid staff (40%) versus volunteer instructors (32%), p=0.03; however, completion rates were low overall. The average class size for a TCBB class was 10 participants and 11 for SAIL. Strategies identified by OHAI staff and volunteers to improve number of sessions completed by participants included: implementing a buddy system for class participants to increase accountability for attendance, offering promotional items for reaching participation goals, adding information about the benefits of completing all class sessions to the class introduction, volunteer refresher training focusing on strategies to encourage class completion, offering classes over 8 weeks instead of 12 weeks, varying the time of day classes are offered, and improving marketing flyers. 
Agenda and Speakers

Janis Campbell

Omolara Henley

Lee Jennings

Keith Kleszynski


Embedded Health Coach in a Geriatrics Practice and working with Community Partners
facilitates EBP enrollment 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Embedded Health Coach in a Geriatrics Practice and working with Community Partners facilitates EBP enrollment

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Overview

The benefits of evidence-based programming for community-dwelling older adults have been proven in clinical trials, but the prescription of these programs by health care professionals has been limited by their knowledge of the programming and their awareness of current offerings in the community. Additionally, the ability to capture data on the outcomes of these programs longitudinally typically limited by the time available to staff and agencies to conduct in-depth surveys or assessments. With funding from the AARP Foundation, Cedars-Sinai Geriatrics partnered with Partners in Care to provide evidence-based programming in the community in a project entitled LEAP: Leveraging Exercise to Age in Place. The AARP Foundation funding also allowed for the support of a Community Health Coach, embedded in the geriatrics clinic, who facilitated enrollment into the classes and consented participants as part of a study to examine the classes longitudinal outcomes on falls, social isolation, and health care utilization. Target Audience: Senior Center Directors, Evidence-Based Program Coordinators, Non-Profit Providers of Evidence-Based Programs; City Governments; Health System Administrators Aim: To present a novel model of care in which health care professionals refer participants using the electronic medical record and a Community Health Coach to evidence-based programming provided by community non-profit partners who assist with tailoring the locations and offerings to meet the needs of the patient population, health system and community at large. Preliminary data on the enrollees will also be presented. Goals: Attendees will learn how a health system engaged with non-profit partners to identify appropriate community sites for classes to best reach their patient population using demographic maps of health system patients and existing and new relationships with municipalities in partnership with the Community Benefits office to maximize successful enrollment. Attendees will learn how the health system created a referral to evidence-based programming in the electronic medical record to enable the Community Health Coach to reach out directly to the interested participants and connect them to nearby evidence-based programming. Attendees will learn how the community health coach worked with non-profit partners to gather study relevant data from participants and partnered to consent participants for data collection. Preliminary data regarding the programming enrollment and baseline characteristics of the enrollees will be presented.
Agenda and Speakers

Dianne Davis

Christy Lau

Allison Mays

Sonja Rosen

Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Community Interventions: Supporting the Reduction of Social Isolation 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Community Interventions: Supporting the Reduction of Social Isolation

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Overview

More people live past the age of 84 than ever recorded, yet many are aging alone without regular social support. Social Isolation has been recognized by the World Health Organization as a determinant of health impacting as many as 17% of older adults. Social services and health care systems are taxed beyond measure, therefore, it will be up to community based organizations throughout the nation to devise and implement programs to serve their populations as the impacts of social isolation and the negative effects it can have environmentally are increasing. As social isolation is drawing more attention to the greater public, an increase in programing to better identify, address, and prevent isolation and loneliness. Recommended interventions to identify and serve individuals who are socially isolated include: community program partnerships, cultural competence, and use of technology services, working with individuals, neighborhoods, and social structures. Two community based organizations actively implementing successful and replicable programs to specifically focus on social isolation interventions to help reduce the number of older adults who are at risk are Los Angeles based ONEgeneration and The Motion Picture & Television Fund. This proposed panel presentation includes representatives from two well-established community based organizations. This panel will share the process and structure of their successful programming that specifically addresses social isolation and loneliness from an individual and organizational perspective. Topics will include prevention of social isolation and addressing social isolation and loneliness on a larger community scale. The non-profit Motion Picture Television Fund (MPTF) created a replicable telephone based, volunteer-driven program that is now engaging hundreds of older volunteers and retired community members called ‘The Daily Call Sheet.’Based on the success of The Daily Call Sheet, MPTF developed a standardized toolkit to enhance learning and has been training other service agencies who seek to adopt a program that help reduce social isolation. Additionally, MPTF hosts an annual Social Isolation Impact Summit for non-profit and community leaders specifically to address Social Isolation from a public health and community perspective. The annual summit engages national thought leaders with featured presentations and workshops where key insights, best practices to collaborate and effectively create meaningful change on the reduction of social isolation are shared. 
Agenda and Speakers

Jenna Hauss

Maureen Feldman

Talking the Same Talk: Making A Matter of Balance Accessible Through Translations 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Talking the Same Talk: Making A Matter of Balance Accessible Through Translations

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Overview

A Matter of Balance is made more accessible to older adults through several translations including language and low vision. Through translations, programs can be made available to meet the diverse and changing needs of older adults. Delivering programs to older adults in their primary language or a format that engages them will significantly influence their participation and experience of the program; yielding more positive benefits. Understanding why it is important to translate is step one. In this session you will learn about successes and challenges encountered with translations, what are the essential “ingredients” needed to translate and progressing on to how to get started with translating the Matter of Balance curriculum. New translations are piloted to validate the conceptual content of the translation. Come interact with the panel that includes current Falls Prevention Grantees and the A Matter of Balance Program Manager to explore how the current program translations have been impactful to date. Who should attend this session: Anyone interested in offering A Matter of Balance in current translations or who would like to work on another translation would benefit. Participants will leave having learned of various translations of A Matter of Balance and how the low vision translation can be a useful tool to serve not only those with vision loss, but also those with lower literacy levels. Learn how to take steps to reach diverse populations of older adults in your own community.
Agenda and Speakers

Melissa Donegan

Christy Lau

Patti League

Disparity, Diversity, and Dementia: A Panel Discussion 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Disparity, Diversity, and Dementia: A Panel Discussion

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Overview

Diversity is an integral part of the mission of the Alzheimer’s Association and its vision of a world without Alzheimer’s disease. The Association seeks to be inclusive of the millions of people currently impacted by Alzheimer's disease, their caregivers, and the communities in which they live. As the American population ages and becomes increasingly more diverse, the Alzheimer's Association will expand its mission activities to remain inclusive of all and meet the demand for culturally and linguistically sensitive services. Due to unique challenges, the Alzheimer’s Association has identified Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, and LGBT communities as priority populations. Although Caucasians make up the majority of the more than 5 million Americans with Alzheimer’s disease, African Americans and Hispanic/Latinos are at higher risk. Despite some evidence that the influence of genetic risk factors on Alzheimer’s and other dementias may differ by race, genetic factors do not appear to account for the large prevalence differences among racial groups. Instead, variations in health, lifestyle, and socioeconomic factors likely account for increased risk. Delayed diagnosis is also a challenge for these groups, meaning that African Americans and Hispanic/Latinos with Alzheimer’s and other dementias may miss the opportunity to make important legal, financial, and care plans while they are still capable. While the LGBT community is just as diverse as the general population in regard to race, ethnicity and socioeconomic status, members of the LGBT community may have unique concerns and challenges as an LGBT person living with dementia or as an LGBT caregiver. Age is the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease among this group and an estimated 2.7 million LGBT people are over 50. LGBT individuals have greater health disparities, many of which are risk factors for dementia, including: depression, obesity, alcohol and tobacco, lower rates of preventive screenings, cardiovascular disease, and HIV/AIDS. LGBT adults living with dementia also face unique challenges accessing support and face discrimination with housing. 
Agenda and Speakers

Rev. Colleen Darraugh

Nelly Garcia

Jane Hunley

Kelly Wilmore

Multiple Strategies to Reach Community-Dwelling Older Adults Who May Be at Risk of
Malnutrition 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Multiple Strategies to Reach Community-Dwelling Older Adults Who May Be at Risk of Malnutrition

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Overview

Stepping Up Your Nutrition (SUYN) is a 2-1/2 hour session zero workshop to help older learn about risk of malnutrition and steps they can take to improve their nutrition. Current research indicates that one in two older adults may be at risk of malnutrition. SUYN can be delivered through group or one-on-one sessions or via a direct-to-consumer informational session and risk assessment. All workshops link to local nutrition resources delivered by Area Agencies on Aging and their partners. The multiple venues for SUYN delivery make this program highly accessible and can easily be integrated into care coordination and other clinical and non-clinical settings. SUYN highlights how muscle loss increases falls risk. The key strategies to improving muscle strength and overall health are to increase protein and fluids throughout the day. Senior center directors, benefits enrollment specialists and evidence-based program coordinators will learn how to connect to malnutrition resources and training.
Agenda and Speakers

Leigh Ann Eagle

Sue Lachenmayr

Matthew Smith

Reaching Out to Combat Social Isolation with No Senior Eats Alone Day 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Reaching Out to Combat Social Isolation with No Senior Eats Alone Day

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Overview

Social isolation is a growing issue for older adults, especially for the 50% of senior women living alone. Baltimore County Department of Aging (BCDA) developed No Senior Eats Alone Day to raise awareness to the detrimental physical and mental impact of social isolation. Senior housing managers, senior center staff, nursing homes activity coordinators and others in the aging field would benefit from learning the following: 1. Statistics on social isolation and older adults, 2. Benefits of sharing a meal for older adults, 3. Organization of a campaign to outreach to older adults for a meal and 4. Guidance of how to engage community partners in the effort. At the conclusion of the presentation, all participants will have the tools to develop an awareness campaign for their community on social isolation and to organize a No Senior Eats Alone Day.
Agenda and Speakers

Laura Riley

Women & Retirement 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Women & Retirement

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Overview

The Women and Retirement program provides deeper insights into the unique challenges women face related to Social Security, health care and long-term care as they prepare for and live in retirement. This program will help identify the key questions females should be asking as they prepare for and live in retirement.
Agenda and Speakers

Roberta Eckert

Improving Financial Well-Being: How Organizations Can Measure Financial Outcomes and
Impact 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Improving Financial Well-Being: How Organizations Can Measure Financial Outcomes and Impact

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Overview

In response to the growing financial challenges faced by older adults, Empowering and Strengthening Ohio’s People (ESOP) launched the Senior Financial Empowerment Initiative (SFEI) in 2014 as an innovative service delivery model to holistically increase the financial well-being of adults aged 55+.  The SFEI offers a wide range of integrative financial counseling, coaching, and education services and resources (e.g., matched savings accounts, foreclosure prevention, vision screenings, benefits enrollment) to promote aging in place and a more secure financial future for some of Ohio’s most vulnerable older adults. Because one of the main outcomes of the SFEI is to improve or maintain the financial well-being of its participants as they age, accurately measuring this outcome is key to assess the effectiveness of the program. In 2015, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) released the Financial Well-Being Scale, the first validated and tested tool to measure a person’s sense of financial well-being. It specifically measures a person’s: (1) control over day-to-day and month-to-month finances; (2) capacity to absorb a financial shock; (3) ability to meet financial goals; and (4) ability to make financial choices to enjoy life.  The Financial Well-Being Scale consists of ten questions. An individual’s response to each of the ten items in the scale yield a score. The score is a standardized number between 0 and 100 that quantifies a person’s underlying level of financial well-being.  In working with an in-kind grant from JPMorgan Chase, ESOP built the CFPB Financial Well-Being Scale into their client management system. Since the spring of 2018, ESOP has been tracking their client’s financial well-being to understand the subjective outcomes and impact of their financial coaching and counseling services in addition to the National Industry Standards of reducing debt, increasing savings, and improving credit scores.  In addition to tracking one-on-one financial coaching and counseling clients, most recently, ESOP has started tracking the financial well-being of a cohort of Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) participants attending monthly financial education workshops in a group setting.  Designed for community-based organizations, researchers, healthcare providers and others that serve older adults, the goal of this presentation is to explore the utility of the CFPB Financial Well-Being Scale and how it can be integrated within an organization to track older adults’ financial progress and ultimately their financial capability. Recommendations for using the CFPB Financial Well-Being Scale for a variety of settings will be discussed and presented alongside research findings that explore the differences and changes in financial well-being among low-income older adults participating in ESOP’s SFEI and financial education workshops.  Attendees will also learn how to use the CFPB Financial Well-Being Scale to measure an older adult’s financial well-being and how to integrate the CFPB Financial Well-Being Scale into their own organization and incorporate into their client management system. Ultimately, attendees will understand the importance of tracking financial well-being over time to support programmatic outcomes and impact of financial coaching, counseling, and educational workshop services.
Agenda and Speakers

Michael Billnitzer

Sonya Edwards