Wednesday, June 10th - All Times EST

NISC State Association Breakfast and Breakfast & Boogie - 9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

NISC State Association Breakfast 9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

NISC State Association Breakfast

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Overview

Join NISC leaders as we celebrate Senior Centers and the state organizations and networks that support, advocate and position them for the future. The NISC State Leader Award winner, David Stevens, Executive Director of the Massachusetts Councils on Aging (MCOA) will present an overview of his agency. An organization that began with one telephone and two staff members and is now a multi department organization on the leading edge of Massachusetts elder programming. And he’ll review their process for securing a stable funding source for senior center activities and state association dues with the Massachusetts Formula Grant. Then his team will lead us through their comprehensive approach to the Pandemic. They have developed three task force teams, the Professional Training Task Force, Consumer Training Task Force and the Reopening Task Force. Each task force will share the goals and the current status. This session is a must see for all individuals involved in state associations or state networks.
Agenda and Speakers

Maureen O'Leary
Scott Harlow
Tracey Colagrossi

Breakfast & Boogie 9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Breakfast & Boogie

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Plenary: Let's Talk: Women & Money as We Age - 10:00 a.m. | Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Plenary 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Let's Talk: Women & Money as We Age

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Overview

The World Economic Forum Global Gender Gap Report states that it will take an estimated 202 years to achieve equal pay between men and women in the world. That. Is. Crazy. If financial empowerment is women's empowerment - what does it take for women to become empowered as they age? Equal pay is just one piece of the puzzle. Financial literacy, paid leave, caregiving, and systemic inequalities facing people of color all affect a woman’s ability to age with economic security. Let's talk about how to lift women up as they age, in order for equality to follow.
Agenda and Speakers

Sindy Benavides

Josephine Kallipeni

Kristi Rodriguez

Karen Biddle Andres

Abigail Zapote

Using "Liberating Structures" to Build Sustainability Strategies for Network Hub
Development 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Using "Liberating Structures" to Build Sustainability Strategies for Network Hub Development

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Overview

The Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) proposes delivering a presentation to provide an overview of the processes and strategies that we used in order to build a plan for the development of a network hub model for Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME) delivery. The target audience for this presentation is anyone looking to meaningfully engage with multiple community partners to assess complex situations and form solid plans for future cooperation and collaboration. We hope to share our experience with the use of innovative tools and strategies to build models for success. In spring 2018, DSHS hosted a summit with several key stakeholders, the goal of which was to develop a strategy and plan for the implementation of a network for unified, statewide CDMSE program delivery. In order to accomplish this task, we used two activities from the Liberating Structures toolset: Mad Tea and Strategy Safari. Liberating Structures is a set of facilitation practices designed to elicit the best ideas from people by liberating them to feel comfortable sharing and developing these ideas. They were created by Keith McCandless and Henri Lipmanowicz, and use insights from complexity science to provide practical insights to groups and organizations. "Liberating Structures are easy-to-learn microstructures that enhance relational coordination and trust. They quickly foster lively participation in groups of any size, making it possible to truly include and unleash everyone. Liberating Structures are a disruptive innovation that can replace more controlling or constraining approaches." (http://www.liberatingstructures.com/) The work to develop these practices started in 2001-2002 with the testing of rough prototypes in healthcare environments and has developed significantly since then. The first activity, "Mad Tea", involves participants standing in two concentric circles, with one inside the other. Each participant is facing another participant in the other circle, and participants take time discussing a defined topic with a participant in the other circle for a predetermined amount of time before the circles rotate so as to provide each participant with a new discussion partner. We hope to present a short video reenactment of this activity. The second activity, "Strategy Safari", empowered the group to come together and clearly define goals and strategies for how to reach them. As a result of this activity, a visual "game plan" was created with several identified strategies for further development of CDSME resources in Washington State. These strategies helped guide DSHS's current 3-year ACL grant project, which aims to establish sustainable systems for continued CDSME delivery statewide. Using the powerful tools offered by Liberating Structures was essential in identifying the current situation of CDSME in Washington State, forming goals for the future of these programs, and outlining strategies for achieving these goals. This innovative process allowed DSHS to meaningfully engage all partners and form solid sustainability strategies for network hub development that are being implemented with our current ACL grant project. We believe facilitation tools like these can play a powerful role in the way we approach community health and transform the way we do business.
Agenda and Speakers

Derek Jenkins

Dawn Shuford-Pavlich

Community Health Workers for an Aging Population: Leading Change in
Community-Based Service Delivery 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Community Health Workers for an Aging Population: Leading Change in Community-Based Service Delivery

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Overview

The Asheville Terrace Community Health Worker (ATCHW) program addresses adverse social circumstances connected to higher rates of chronic illness in older adults. Community Health Workers (CHW) are peer leaders trained to provide non-clinical support to individuals and communities and partner to provide access to social and clinical services. Our focus is on improving social connectivity, safety, physical activity and nutrition. The Area Agency on Aging (AAA) at Land of Sky Regional Council has created program standards, based on the ATCHW model, to justifying use of Home and Community Care Block Grant, Title IIIB for launching additional CHW programs. If successful, the North Carolina network of AAAs will have a sustainable funding mechanism for developing and maintaining CHW programs. 
Agenda and Speakers

Stephanie Stewart

Aging into Disability and the Americans with Disabilities Act 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Aging into Disability and the Americans with Disabilities Act

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Overview

Disabilities are typically thought of as physical, cognitive, psychiatric, or sensory impairments that an individual might have from birth, such as deafness or cerebral palsy. They also may be acquired as the result of an injury. However, many people "age into disability." The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) offers protections to millions of citizens who acquire disabilities through the normal process of aging, with important implications for access to communities, health care, and civic life. The ADA requires physical, communication, and program access to services, facilities, and events but, unfortunately, many aging citizens are unaware of their rights to access and accommodations when they have barriers associated with age-onset disabilities. This can be critical when accessing legal or health care services, for example, but it can also provide opportunities for greater participation in civic life, as well as employment for those who want to work. Objectives: This presentation and discussion will assist participants in understanding the rights and responsibilities of physical access for people with mobility-related disabilities and effective communication for people with hearing, vision, and cognitive disabilities in various settings. 
Agenda and Speakers

Michael Richardson

Can I Get into Your Virtual Door?: How Accessible Are You? 10:00 a.m - 11:00 a.m.

Can I Get into Your Virtual Door?: How Accessible Are You?

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Overview

2020 marks the 30th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 yet there are many barriers remaining for people with disabilities to have full and equal access to society. Over the past 30 years a great deal of attention has been focused on the accessibility of the physical environment. As society has changed and we have become more "technology dependent" the concern has shifted and whether or not our "virtual environment" is accessible. This includes information that is presented electronically, including but not limited to websites, mobile apps, social media platforms, multi-media content and electronic documents or communication tools such as email, discussion boards, etc.. We have shifted our methods of communication and modes of doing business away from the telephone or pen and paper to directing people to visit our website or link to our social media channels to sign up for benefits or services, stay informed and conduct research on various topics. Yet many individuals who have limitations in vision and/or hearing, cognition or mobility are left out. Age is the strongest predictor of hearing loss among adults, with the greatest amount of hearing loss in the 60 and above age group. This is also true among individuals who experience a loss of sight. The highest population of individuals who are considered blind or legally blind are 65 years of age and older. Another group that is often overlooked are older individuals who have diminished motor skills due to arthritis or other disease processes. Lastly, little thought is given to individuals who experience a loss of cognition as they age but still want to connect to the world around them through the internet. Use of the internet and social media by older persons is growing. A study of internet use among older persons in the US shows that they are connected for product research (66%), purchase goods (47%), make travel reservations (41%), visit government Web sites (100%), look up religious and spiritual information (26%) and do online banking (20%). The courts as well as consumers of goods and services have begun to take notice of the inaccessibility of the electronic technology that is being utilized by a cross section of entities and putting pressure on these institutions to address accessibility. This session is intended for any entity that has a web based presence and is communicating with their constituency through electronic methods. During this session we will review the common barriers found on websites, social media platforms and multi-media programs and discuss best practices and established guidelines for accessibility of information technology. Participants will be provided with resources and tools for evaluating their own agency/organizations accessibility and instructions on how to develop an action plan to ensure that they are equipped to address accessibility not only in their physical environments but also in their virtual environments.
Agenda and Speakers

Robin Jones

Medicare Plan Finder: The Devil is in the Details 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Medicare Plan Finder: The Devil is in the Details

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Overview

The session will provide an overview of the recent changes to Medicare plan finder and most commonly reported problems. Attendees will learn proactive steps to help beneficiaries identify plan sorting issues, coverage and cost details, and plan restrictions that determine if a plan provides optimal coverage. Lastly, the session will explain the Special Enrollment Period available to Medicare beneficiaries who enrolled into a sub-optimal plan due to information provided by plan finder. The session will be conducted by 1-2 SHIP directors/staff and NCOA staff familiar with the MPF and changes impacting the most recent Medicare open enrollmnent. The session is designed for anyone that counsels or works with Medicare beneficiaries and is interested in improving their financial well- being through improved Medicare plan choice.
Agenda and Speakers

Alicia Jones

Josephine "Jo" Paul

Ann Kayrish

The Legacy of Neglect: Aging Vietnam Era Veterans 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

The Legacy of Neglect: Aging Vietnam Era Veterans

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Overview

This session will present the mental and physical health needs of aging veterans, challenges in housing frail veterans, and strategies to increase access to benefits and resources for this growing population. We are facing a crisis of need among aging and Vietnam-era veterans. Sixty-eight percent of all veterans are age 55 and over, and the average age of Vietnam veterans is 68. The population express physical and mental frailties beyond their age. Early onset dementia is associated with PTSD and traumatic brain injury, and Agent Orange exposure is connected to a host of conditions including diabetes, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and other cancers. Many providers are not aware of the impact of military service, eligibility for veteran care, or the complex intersection of VA and community resources. Only 40 percent of Vietnam veterans use VA health care, the majority seek care from community systems which may lack understanding of veteran culture, unique health risks and potential resources. Vietnam veterans are over-represented among the chronically homeless, and older veterans are at increased risk of suicide; two-thirds of veterans who complete suicide are age 50 or older. Veterans have long been overrepresented among those who experience homelessness. More than half of veterans who experience homelessness are over 51, and the number of veterans over 62 experiencing homelessness increased by 54% from 2009 and 2015. The legacy of chronic homelessness and military injuries and exposures complicate these veterans long term care. PTSD and exposure to Agent Orange have lasting consequences which may manifest or worsen decades after service. Providers are seeing increases in age-and-veteran-related issues: late-onset stress symptomology (LOSS), poverty, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and mobility issues. We will review common factors of Vietnam-era military and veteran culture, basic eligibility requirements for VA service-connected benefits and care, and how to overcome barriers to eligibility through change of character of service or discharge upgrade processes. We also will discuss strategies for collaboration between veteran and geriatric providers to improve supportive housing service
Agenda and Speakers

Amy Fairweather

Megan Zottarelli

Si se Puede! Stepping On Falls Prevention Prepares to Release its Spanish Version:
Pisando Fuerte 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Si se Puede! Stepping On Falls Prevention Prepares to Release its Spanish Version: Pisando Fuerte

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Overview

We are excited to share that Pisando Fuerte is in its final year of packaging and will become available in 2021. After years of research and testing, the University of Wisconsin's Community Academic Aging Research Network (CAARN) has tested and adapted a highly effective and popular evidence-based Stepping On Falls Prevention program to serve the Spanish speaking communities. The program was much more than a simple language translation, as researchers sought out and listened to the needs of the community in designing the Spanish version of the program. Some of the subtle, but important changes in the Spanish version include: 8 sessions, appropriate resources and content to reflect the culture and an increase of time for each session, per the request of the participants. In 2020, CAARN will begin to roll out the program in Wisconsin and Minnesota, refining the Leader Training materials, Leader Manual and participant materials. This workshop will feature both one of the lead researchers (who will participate remotely, on-line) and the Community Research Associate who together with Latinx partners, are completing the work. Workshop participants will learn about the program, how they can bring Pisando Fuerte to their organization and community through either training of new Spanish-speaking Leaders or cross-training of Leaders already trained in English. Licensing structure will also be discussed. Participants will also learn how the Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging, the programs' purveyor, can provide support in grant proposals and other funding opportunities for implementing the program, including to ACL, which has already confirmed that the program meets its standards for "high-level evidence-based." ¿Lista? Nosotros tambien! Workshop is appropriate for aging network, health care providers, public health, evidence-based health promotion program providers, including current Stepping On licensees or those interested in securing a license.
Agenda and Speakers

Shannon Myers
Maria Mora Pinzon

Plenary: Honoring Those Who Serve: Veterans Aging in Place - 11:30 a.m. | Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Plenary 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Honoring Those Who Serve: Veterans Aging in Place

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Overview

For our nation’s military veterans and service members age 65 or older, numbered in excess of 12.4 million, it takes a network, a village, and collaborative effort that never ends. To help support them, a vast network suport those who have served in conflicts around the world - including World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and in the Persian Gulf War and others. Join us in learning more about how organizations, agencies, and service providers are helping veterans to age in place.
Agenda and Speakers

Gena Byrd

Mary Culley

Sherman Gillums

Joel Kelly

100M Healthier Lives: Baltimore County's Experience Using the Adult Well-Being
Assessment Tool 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

100M Healthier Lives: Baltimore County's Experience Using the Adult Well-Being Assessment Tool

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Overview

Baltimore County, MD is partnering with the National Council on Aging (NCOA) on a three-year project to assess the social and behavioral determinants of health of its older residents as part of the global 100 Million Healthier Lives Initiative. Using the Adult Well-Being Assessment (AWA), a validated 8-question survey that asks individuals to rate their overall well-being (current and in 2-years); financial, physical, mental, and spiritual health; social support; and social isolation, Baltimore County has been able to obtain data for more than 10,000 individuals for two years in a row. Learn how data from the AWA has resulted in improved services to Baltimore County residents, a greater understanding of Baltimore County's older population and the impact that senior centers have on the social and behavioral determinants of health. Information will also be presented from Year Two that compares senior center members to the general public in terms of the eight AWA questions. Session participants will be able to determine how they can implement the Adult Well-Being Assessment in their community and contribute data to the 100M Lives initiative. This session would be of interest to senior center staff, community health workers, and anyone researching the social and behavioral determinants of health.
Agenda and Speakers

Jill Hall

LIVE WELL Initiative from United Way of Tarrant County 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

LIVE WELL Initiative from United Way of Tarrant County

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Overview

In response to the United Way of Tarrant County's (UWTC) 2020 Bold Goal, the LIVE WELL Initiative developed a Bold Goal to improve the lives of 17,000 adults with ongoing health concerns by the year 2020. To achieve the Bold Goal, UWTC partnered with six community-based organizations (CBOs) who provide 10 evidence-based and/or evidence-informed programs that decreased preventable hospitalizations, emergency department visits and improve quality of life through healthy behaviors and self-management techniques. This presentation will describe 10 programs from six partner CBOs, report achievements in the outcome measures, performance standards, and the sheer volume of the data collected (n=18,000), and discuss evaluation strategy for 9 years. After attending this session, the participants will 1) understand efforts to improve health outcomes for adults with ongoing health concerns, 2) learn how to reduce healthcare cost in community settings, and 3) identify characteristics of unique strategies and successful partnership among CBOs.
Agenda and Speakers

Jinmyoung Cho

Donald Smith

Benefits of Congregate Meal Programs on Health and Wellness 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Benefits of Congregate Meal Programs on Health and Wellness

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Overview

Much evidence exists that socializing is good for your physical and mental health. Socializing is as important as exercising and eating right. It allows your brain to remain engaged and functional. As aging professionals, you see first-hand how sociable your seniors are at your congregate sites and many of your seniors may have told you how much they appreciate the program. Did you know that we are seeing some really great results nationwide? During this session, you will hear results from ACL's Nutrition evaluation --what the evaluation is showing on the congregate nutrition program and its impact on health care. You will learn about the findings from a three-year National Association of Nutrition and Aging Services Programs (NANASP) socialization research project which was funded by The Retirement Research Foundation and took place between June 2016 and November 2019. In order to study the benefits of Older Americans Act (OAA) funded Congregate Nutrition programs to the health and well-being of older adults, NANASP surveyed a total of 3,824 Congregate Nutrition program participants in 14 states and also collected 90 surveys from Congregate Nutrition program providers. NANASP Executive Director Bob Blancato also visited 21 Congregate Nutrition program sites, speaking with more than 1,100 participants nationally. You will learn how to talk about the results from the evaluation and the project and how you can use that to educate your local officials on the many benefits.
Agenda and Speakers

Bob Blancato

Keri Lipperini

National Resource Centers on Healthy Aging and Amazon: What We Have in Common 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

National Resource Centers on Healthy Aging and Amazon: What We Have in Common

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Overview

The Administration for Community Living funds twenty-three National Resource Centers and Consortia (NRCs) that provide information on a variety of topics targeted at Aging Network professionals and lay consumers. Of these, two NRCs are dedicated to healthy aging and nutrition: National Council on Aging's Center on Healthy Aging and Meals on Wheels America's National Resource Center on Nutrition and Aging (NRCNA). Both NRCs work locally and nationally to advocate for and support aging services providers and the seniors they serve. So, what do these two NRCs have in common with the online retail giant, Amazon? Join this engaging and dynamic session to find out! Come learn how NRCs leverage client-focused strategic plans, data and technology to meet the technical assistance, education and training needs of healthy aging-focused Aging Network professionals. Target audiences: Local aging services providers (senior center director, benefits enrollment specialist, evidence-based program coordinator, etc.). Those who participate in this session will: (1) Gain insights on how two National Resource Centers support the technical assistance, training, education, and information needs of a diverse community of stakeholders (i.e., Aging Network providers, consumers, nutrition professionals, etc.); and (2) Leverage practice-informed case studies to spark innovative ideas for addressing the healthy aging programming and service needs of community-residing older adults.
Agenda and Speakers

Uche Akobundu

Kathleen Zuke

Grandparents Raising Grandchildren is a National Concern 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Grandparents Raising Grandchildren is a National Concern

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Overview

The number of grandparents raising grandchildren is a growing phenomenon in the US. Over 2.5 million grandparents are raising their grandchildren according to a 2014 survey; a 7% increase in 5 years. Florida has the third highest number of grandparents raising grandchildren. According to the 2010 census, over 345,000 children under 18 years old in Florida are being reared by relatives. That number increased by over 131,000 children the following year and the numbers are still climbing. This trend is true for the entire country. This presentation will describe to senior center directors, staff and other aging professionals how to set up and run a program designed to help grandparents and other relatives manage their new lives with unexpected children. By keeping families intact, studies have found that the children do much better in life while also maintaining a sense of family identity. And with support, grandparents also do well and report greater life satisfaction. Grandparents find themselves in this unique situation suddenly and struggle physically, psychologically, socially and financially dealing with this new situation. They usually are overwhelmed and unprepared when trying to figure out how to accommodate the addition of young children. But they will do whatever it takes to keep their families together and keep the children out of foster care, which saves US taxpayers billions of dollars. These grandparents often find themselves struggling financially or working longer; feeling isolated, angry and depressed; becoming physically exhausted and sacrificing their own health to mention just a few things. The mission of the Grandparents as Parents (GaP) program is to provide support, resources and information to grandparents and other relatives who have custody of a relative's child/children. This is done by providing monthly evening support groups and monthly luncheons which feature an educational presentation, health screenings, exhibits from local community agencies, and free legal services. GaP also offers holiday parties, family picnics, and field trips for the grand-families. The GaP participants report access to resources and information is beneficial, but that socialization with other grandparents in a similar situation is the best part of the program because it helps combat isolation. The evening support group, held in conjunction with the Circle of Parents program, allows grandparents to talk openly in a relaxed, small group environment on topics they choose while childcare is provided in an adjoining room. The group is facilitated by the program coordinator and trained parent leaders. After the support group discussion, a complimentary dinner is provided for the grand-families. At the monthly GaP luncheon, there is a featured presentation on a topic of interest. Local social service agencies are invited to attend as exhibitors who briefly explain their services, provide printed information and are available throughout the meeting to answer questions. An attorney from Legal Services of North Florida attends each meeting and space is available so that participants can confer privately. A nurse attends each meeting providing health information and health screenings such as blood pressure.
Agenda and Speakers

Karen Boebinger

Susan Davis

Digital Empowerment: Online Banking Classes for Older Adults 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Digital Empowerment: Online Banking Classes for Older Adults

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Overview

Financial empowerment is critical to aging well. But as the banking world becomes more and more digital, millions of older adults are being left behind. Are the older adults at your center equipped to handle their all-important banking needs online? What if they are homebound or have never used a computer? What if they are Spanish speakers? Where can they get the training they need - and how can you avoid re-inventing the wheel in designing a program from scratch? This presentation will address all of those questions. Since 2015 the Northwest Side Housing Center (NWSHC), located in Chicago, has run an innovative program, partnered with Capital One Bank called, "Ready, Set, Bank!" an online banking workshop series specially designed for older adults. With this user-friendly course and easy to understand lessons, older adults are taught essential computer skills to become financially empowered and independent and less isolated from their bank, especially low-income seniors with limited transportation options. If you're a program director or site director at a senior center, this program is vital for your participants to gain confidence in navigating the world of online banking - a world that is rapidly changing. In this presentation you'll hear from Linda Peters, Director of Older Adult Programs for NWSHC and a representative from Capital One Bank sharing their experiences about how this program works and the benefits to exploring it for your center. And now the NWSHC has launched a Spanish version of the course, "Listos, Clic, Avance!" to empower Latinos toward financial stability. This program has transformed the lives of many older adults who were dependent on family and even friends to help them with their banking needs. In this presentation, you'll hear success stories and how Capital One Bank engages with NWSHC in comprehensive ways, not just as a funder, but as a program partner, and how this has increased the impact on older adults on Chicago's Northwest Side.
Agenda and Speakers

Linda Peters

James Rudyk

Jamie Lutton

Thinking Outside the Box to Build Connections and Drive Sustainable Evidence-Based
Program Growth Statewide 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Thinking Outside the Box to Build Connections and Drive Sustainable Evidence-Based Program Growth Statewide

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Overview

When building a strong partner base, what all goes in to thinking outside the box? Join us for an entertaining and fast paced look at South Dakota's falls and chronic disease self-management education program, known as Better Choices-Better Health® South Dakota (BCBH-SD). You'll experience that true ingenuity takes vision, planning, focus, patience, a willingness to change, and the ability to maintain your sense of humor. South Dakota State University, the license holder for BCBH-SD, was a recipient of both the 2019 Administration on Community Living's CDSME and Falls Prevention funding and is addressing a need to develop an evidence-based network hub while simultaneously creating a plan to sustain their program efforts. In this session you'll see a detailed overview of the planning that is taking this statewide project from vision to reality; including the positive attitude and occasional flashes of brilliance needed. You'll hear what is needed to attract the best partners, how to define what data will demonstrate success, how data reporting impacts sustainability, how BCBH-SD is positioning itself for public and private payer billing, and more. 
Agenda and Speakers

Megan Jaconson

Lynnzy McIntosh

Lori Oster

Medicaid Strategies for Payment of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Programs 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Medicaid Strategies for Payment of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Programs

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Overview

In early 2020, NCOA released a report on Medicaid as a payor for evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention programs. This report identified Medicaid authorities and financing mechanisms through which states have adopted evidence-based health promotion programs, barriers to adoption, and promising practices establishing reimbursable evidence-based health promotion programs and approaches that may be replicated in other states. This session will present key findings from the report, state examples and actionable information for community-based organizations to move forward with relationships with state Medicaid programs or Medicaid managed care organizations.
Agenda and Speakers

Dianne Davis

Sarah Barth

Kathleen Cameron

Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Forging Pathways to Sustainability: Lessons Learned from Three Learning Collaboratives 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Forging Pathways to Sustainability: Lessons Learned from Three Learning Collaboratives

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Overview

Community-based organizations across the country have been challenged with the task of building the skills and capacity to identify more diverse sustainability strategies, including leveraging payment options through Medicare, Medicaid, and other health care organizations. This panel presentation will provide a detailed overview of the design of the National Council on Aging's three learning collaboratives focused on building long-term sustainability for community-based organizations through intensive learning sessions and peer-networking. Learning collaborative alumni will share about their experience pursuing payment through Medicare reimbursement, seeking Medicare Advantage contracts, and building network. Speakers will address progress-to-date, successful strategies, and lessons learned along the way. This session will be most useful for organizations seeking to learn more about advanced sustainability strategies.
Agenda and Speakers

Nikki Kmicinski

Aleta McLean

Carol Montoya

Sharon Williams

Kathleen Zuke

Generation X: Preparing for the New Generation of the Aging Populations 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Generation X: Preparing for the New Generation of the Aging Populations

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Overview

In 2030, the first of the Generation X cohort will be turning 65. With the MTV generation aging, it is important to learn about opportunities to strengthen community social and physical infrastructure to support this autonomous, flexible and cynical generation. Understanding the social threads of Gen-Xer's formative years provides context to the variety of Gen-X worldviews and complexity of this generation. Navigating recommendations for opportunities to integrate Generation-X into the aging services system included, determining current community strengths and opportunities, facilitating a cross-sector discussion of Gen-X's strengths and needs, and assessing variables of social determinants of health with a community survey. All of which provided information to guide recommendations to best serve the next generation of the aging population. The Hanover Township Department of Aging Services is located in west suburbs of Chicago. Its mission is "Enriching Lives, Fostering Friendships, Promoting Independence," which is the foundation of all of the department's programs and services. The Senior Center, transportation, enrichment and lifelong learning opportunities, social services, senior mental health services, café, home delivered meal program, and a wide breadth of volunteer opportunities continue to engage adults aged 55 and better. The senior center is accredited by the National Council on Aging adhering to nine standards of excellence. While Hanover Township has many overall good qualities that support aging well, there are also opportunities to strengthen the social and physical infrastructure. Some barriers to aging well in the community that were generated from the Aging Symposium and community survey included, retirement planning, affordable housing, reducing the costs of medications and access to transportation. As Gen-X ages, there are many opportunities to evolve Hanover Township's Department of Aging Services including diversifying senior center programs and events to reflect the cultural make-up of the community, expanding mental health services, building an Age Friendly Community Collaborative Coalition, delivering Workforce Wellness trainings and community outreach as well as looking into starting an integrated Adult Day Services program. Shared housing, Lifestyle Centers and other opportunities also emerged as ideas to better support individuals to age in the community. Determining parallel needs across generational cohorts can help provide opportunities for better community cohesion through collaborative approaches that work towards ensuring the community is livable and accessible for all ages. With more than 70% of Americans feeling lonely, it is important to cultivate organic community connection points to foster opportunities for residents to interact with and create friendships with fellow residents of all ages. 
Agenda and Speakers

Tracey Colagrossi

Sandra Pastore 

Talkin' Bout Your Generation: Intergenerational Volunteer Management 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Talkin' Bout Your Generation: Intergenerational Volunteer Management

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Overview

This session will be an open discussion forum to help develop resources and strategies to get to know motivations of the four main generations in the volunteer workforce: Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials. After a short introduction of the present and topics, we will break the group into separate generations to discuss amongst their peers the defining moments, strengths, weaknesses, and stereotypes of their own generation. If there is no one in attendance for a generation, the group will discuss that generation together. Each small group will assign a spokesperson to tell how they answered each question and then the entire group will have a chance to add to the discussion. I will be using the PowerPoint presentation to show the research that has been done on each generation as well to see if the group discussion matches the research statistics and analysis. Before the close of the session, I will ask each participant to take part of "The Functional Approach to Volunteers' Motivations" survey to provide a self-assessment of their personal volunteer motivations. This is an effective tool to use on current volunteers in an organization to learn what motivates them to be a volunteer so that they can be effectively kept engaged in activities.
Agenda and Speakers

Sidney Schuttrow

Not Your Same Old Senior Center Programming: Lifelong Learning and Outdoor Pursuits
Engage All Ages 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Not Your Same Old Senior Center Programming: Lifelong Learning and Outdoor Pursuits Engage All Ages

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Overview

Seniors come from diverse backgrounds with a variety of interests and talents. Many of today's retirees are seeking active lifestyles and entertaining adventures. Studies show that staying physically and mentally challenged can help older adults stay healthy and independent longer. Senior Center directors and program coordinators will get ideas for developing dynamic, diverse, and affordable Lifelong Learning and Outdoor Pursuits programs that engage all ages of our senior population from baby boomers to nonagenarians. Back due to popular interest, this year's session expands on how to enlist local resources and community partnerships to create programming that will energize your current participants and bring in new ones. Our Lifelong Learning classes and field trips include a variety of topics such as local history, US history, world history, current events, music, art, science, mathematics, literature, nature, culture, travel, food, drink and more. It is very rewarding to see participants excited to learn new things and engage in lively discussions and critical thinking. The Lifelong Learning field trips take us to local and regional sites of interest. Participants have learned how to make chocolate, butter, cheese, soap, and cocktails. They have visited a wolf preserve, marine lab, and learned how to play the Balinese Gamelan. Lifelong Outdoor Pursuits participants enjoy hiking on beautiful trails in local parks, learning new skills such as fly fishing, kayaking, or golf, making friends, and maybe even developing a new hobby. Judy, an 87-year-old who participates in both Lifelong Learning and Outdoor Pursuits programs, states that, "These activities keep me from being isolated. Lifelong Learning keeps my brain busy, so my brain cells don't collapse. Being outdoors with Lifelong Outdoor Pursuits heals me. If anything is bothering me, outdoor activity makes me feel better."
Agenda and Speakers

Susan Davis

Maureen Haberfeld

Caring for Those Who Care: Meeting the Needs of Diverse Family Caregivers 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Caring for Those Who Care: Meeting the Needs of Diverse Family Caregivers

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Overview

Over the past two years, the Diverse Elders Coalition has conducted extensive research on the needs of family caregivers in communities of color, LGBT communities, and American Indian/Alaska Native communities. Through stakeholder interviews, surveys, and focus groups, we now understand that diverse family caregivers have unique needs that require targeted programming and tailored solutions to improve their physical, mental, and social health. Join staff of the Diverse Elders Coalition for a workshop on the findings from our caregiving research and others in the field, and learn how that research can be applied to your existing healthcare practice, aging services programming, or advocacy work. We're building a community of providers who are improving caregiving for diverse older adults by supporting those who care. Join us! The Diverse Elders Coalition's caregiving research and programming is generously supported by a grant from The John A. Hartford Foundation.
Agenda and Speakers

Jenna McDavid

Sex and the Aging Mastery Program: Creating a Curriculum for Improving the Sexual
Health of Older Adults 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Sex and the Aging Mastery Program: Creating a Curriculum for Improving the Sexual Health of Older Adults

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Overview

Aging Mastery Program (AMP) is a comprehensive and fun approach to aging well that encourages people to take actions to enhance their health, financial well-being, social connectedness, and overall quality of life. The AMP curriculum contains 10 core and 9 elective classes. With funding from the Health Foundation of Western and Central New York, we have collaborated with a subject-matter expert whose medical practice and research has included older adult sexual health to create a tenth AMP elective on the topic of Aging and Sexual Health. With support from the foundation, we have also conducted six pilot classes and two focus groups on the topic of Older Adults and Sexual Health. The purpose of this session is to present the findings from the pilot class evaluation and focus groups. Our target audience will be senior centers and other community-based organizations within the NCOA network. We will discuss the responses and feedback of older adults to a diverse range of topics, including modules on mitigating the effects of chronic conditions on sexual function, STIs, discussing intimacy with a partner, and dating (with particular reference to online dating,) as an older adult. We will also discuss the curriculum content in general, as well as provide a brief outline of curriculum development process. We are tentatively hopeful to have one of the partners we worked with on this project join us as a co-presenter for this session. Through the work we did on this project, we have gained a more nuanced perspective on older adult sexuality and challenges facing older adults in their intimate lives. We are planning to disseminate the materials developed through this project to community-based organizations throughout NCOA's network.
Agenda and Speakers

Kenneth Rosenkranz

Susan Stiles

Older Immigrants: Access to Public Benefits and "Public Charge" 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Older Immigrants: Access to Public Benefits and "Public Charge"

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Overview

Last year, the federal administration finalized a significant change to the "public charge" law that may profoundly impact the receipt or potential receipt of certain public benefits for older adult immigrants. Even before the "Public charge" regulation was finalized, community-based organizations reported the chilling effect of the regulations on immigrants applying for or renewing public benefits. There is a lot of confusion as to who the law effects, which public benefits are considered when determining a public charge and during what time period. While the final rule was to become effective on October 15, 2019, federal courts have prohibited it from taking effect at this time. During this workshop, presenters will inform attendees about the public charge law and how it affects, and does not affect, older immigrants. Presenters will provide updates on the status of the implementation of the "public charge" law, including nationwide litigation, and how community-based organizations have worked to provide accurate information, reduce the negative effect in their communities and counter the misperception of the effects of the law.
Agenda and Speakers

Leslie Fried

Natalie Kean

Come One, Come All: An Inclusivity Module to Train Peer Leaders of the Chronic Disease
Self-Management Program 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Come One, Come All: An Inclusivity Module to Train Peer Leaders of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program

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Overview

In partnership with the Wyoming Institute for Disabilities and the Wyoming Department of Health, the Wyoming Center on Aging created an inclusivity training module for Leaders of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program. The module, which can be delivered during a Leader training or any time after a Leader is trained, includes training on the importance of inclusive CDSMP workshops, people first language, presuming competence, physical workshop accommodations, and workshop delivery accommodations. The module is formatted similar to CDSMP training manuals, making it easy for Master Trainers and T-Trainers to deliver, and includes techniques like brainstorming, call-outs, and poster reference; the module also includes two original posters, which are also formatted similar to CDSMP posters. This inclusivity module has been piloted with Leaders in Wyoming. The reception has been overwhelmingly positive and feedback indicates that participants value the addition of this training. This session will provide information on the creation of the inclusivity training module, feedback from trainees participating in the pilot of the module, and a demonstration of the module. Attendees interested in obtaining the module will be provided further information during the session.
Agenda and Speakers

Catherine Carrico

Dominick Duhamel

Canyon Hardesty

Partner Spotlight: Amgen and Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Partner Spotlight: Amgen 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Take Charge of Osteoporosis

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Agenda and Speakers

Kathleen Cameron
Bryan Walker, PharmD

Reaching Rural Seniors by Adapting an Evidence-Based Program 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Reaching Rural Seniors by Adapting an Evidence-Based Program

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Overview

It is well documented that seniors in rural areas have greater challenges accessing health and social services and experience worse health outcomes than their counterparts living in urban areas. This disparity is important to redress because a greater proportion of older adults live in rural areas, and their numbers are expected to continue to grow. Evidence Based health promotion Programs (EBPs) have been shown to improve health outcomes for older adults; however, EBP dissemination in rural areas faces several challenges. We have successfully brought the Fit & Strong! (FS!) EBP, into several rural communities in Minnesota through a partnership with Catholic Charities of Southern Minnesota (CCSM). To achieve this objective, we made several key adaptations to the program. Typically, FS! Is led by certified fitness instructors, who are certified by a nationally accredited organization such as the ACSM. Since we knew that these accredited fitness instructors might be unavailable in rural areas, we developed a new model to train lay leaders, who have experience leading a comparable EBP, as FS! Instructors. The customary certified exercise instructor training was conducted over 8 hours. We expanded the lay leader training to 12 hours to include additional modeling of the exercises, and modules on exercise safety and physiology. CCSM used this lay leader training model to train a network of senior volunteers in FS! and began offering classes in 2017. This network of senior volunteers has brought FS! to over 20 locations, in 16 different sites across southern Minnesota, the vast majority of which are in rural areas. CCSM continues to offer FS! classes through southern Minnesota with plans to expand into new rural communities. CCSM also has elected to have several of their instructors trained as Master Trainers, enabling them to train new lay leader instructors within their organization as staff turn over and they expand into new geographic areas. In addition to these efforts in Minnesota, South Dakota State University Extension (SDSUE) was awarded a 3-year ACL grant to bring FS! to rural communities across South and North Dakota. In year one (2019-2020) SDSUE will deliver FS! in eight rural communities across the two states. SDSUE will deliver FS! using a combination of certified fitness and lay leader instructors. FS! has also recently developed an online instructor training course. By removing the need to travel and reducing costs, this tool can be used to reach trainees in rural or hard-to-access communities. Currently the online training is only available for certified exercise instructors, but additional modules for lay leaders are currently in development. As a result of these efforts we hope to help bridge the access gap and enable more older adults in rural areas across the U.S., to benefit from the program.
Agenda and Speakers

Andrew DeMott

Susan Hughes

Make a Difference! Community-Based Approaches to Falls Prevention 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Make a Difference! Community-Based Approaches to Falls Prevention

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Overview

Innovative practices to engage a community to provide fall prevention initiatives. Geo-mapping and heat maps were created with Emergency Medical Services (EMS) data to identify locations with high densities of persons responded to due to a fall. Maps were used by FWSCC to strategically plan events in areas of highest demand.  Comprehensive programs developed by FWSCC partners used the Center for Disease Control 'Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries' (STEADI) as a model to improve patient outcomes by supporting evidence-based care in preventing falls. EMS provider, Medical MedStar Mobile Healthcare, implemented a standardized falls risk assessment protocol and connected referrals for individualized care within their electronic record system. Community-Based Falls Prevention Toolkit emphasized the use of local community resources to conduct fall risk screenings, assess for modifiable fall risks, and provide information on resources available in the community to maintain independence. 
Agenda and Speakers

Kathleen Camp

Kimberly McFarland

Amanda Robbins

Brandon Pate

Grassroots Advocacy and Education: Strengthening Skills & Tools with Candidates and
Congress 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Grassroots Advocacy and Education: Strengthening Skills & Tools with Candidates and Congress

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Overview

Anyone who works with older adults and wants to make sure their needs are met should attend this workshop. Building relationships with policymakers is essential for the success of your organization, and improving the lives of older adults you serve. We're also halfway through an election year in which votes will be cast for President, all U.S. House of Representatives seats, one-third of U.S. Senators, and a variety of state and local offices. Candidates know that older adults vote, so they're seeking opportunities to make their cases Don't miss an opportunity to leverage this unique access to your advantage. In this session, the NCOA Public Policy & Advocacy team will not only share strategies for being a more effective advocate in your community but also will expand on the policy priorities and tips provided in the Election 2020 Advocacy Toolkit deployed earlier this year. In addition, your colleagues from the aging network will share how they've made the most of these engagements with candidates and members of Congress. Role-playing activities will be employed to show how easy and effective you too can be at making seniors' voices heard in this election year and in the future.
Agenda and Speakers

Howard Bedlin

Marci Phillips

Extending Your Reach: Innovative Partnership Strategies 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Extending Your Reach: Innovative Partnership Strategies

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Overview

AgeOptions innovates, partners, and advocates to improve systems and services in order to strengthen communities so people can thrive as they age. In this presentation we will share the strategies used by AgeOptions' Benefits Enrollment Center (BEC) to extend our reach throughout our service area with innovative use of community partnerships. We have found that building strong ties to venues such as libraries and faith based organizations helps our BEC introduce more consumers, who otherwise may not be aware of older adult services, to the public benefits for which they are eligible. Futhermore, working with a wide array of partners has enhanced our expertise by informing our programmatic practices. We continue to build on our lessons learned to make the following partnerships more effective. We will discuss: The evolution of public libraries and how AgeOptions is engaging the local library system The ways in which "café model" projects widen outreach to specialized populations (GLBT) What our BEC does to raise awareness of benefits for older adults with state/local legislators through trainings How involvement on advocacy-based workgroups (SNAP Advocates, DHS Community Quality Council) has positioned us to more effectively serve our clients. Participants will learn about the challenges and successes of bringing benefits access work into these areas and provide tips on how you can replicate our efforts in your own service area.
Agenda and Speakers

Joy Aaronson

An Intergenerational Conversation—A Meeting in the Middle: Millennials, Baby Boomers,
and Older Adults 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

An Intergenerational Conversation—A Meeting in the Middle: Millennials, Baby Boomers, and Older Adults

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Overview

"OK, Boomer." This phrase-turned-meme highlights a larger problem around how each generation relates to one another in our society. Although age and experience may be what differentiates us, common threads - such as feelings of financial insecurity - transcend these barriers. This session will bring various perspectives to the table for a discussion on the challenges that current retirees and those nearing retirement face, transitioning to the financial outlook for Social Security and long-term financial stability for millennials and Gen Zs. We will draw on the collective work (currently in process) between NCOA, Latinos for a Secure Retirement, and Funding Our Future and present some of the new white paper's highlights, including the outlook for younger Americans and the urgency around Social Security solvency in context with other factors including longevity and debt. Using this frame, we hope to change the narrative and dialogue, to shift from pitting generations against each other to bringing these different viewpoints together around a discussion on the shared challenges our nation faces, which allows us to learn from each other and explore possible solutions for these issues.
Agenda and Speakers

Vivian Nava-Schellinger
Kara Watkins
Tim Shaw
Moderator - Abigail Zapote

NC SHIIP - Rebranding the Brand 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

NC SHIIP - Rebranding the Brand

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Overview

Times have changed, along with the dynamics of our clients. But have we, as an organization, taken a step back to look at our marketing messages and outreach strategies? Can one word really make a difference in marketing for Extra Help? How do you respond as a program when leadership changes? How can connecting with partners that support social determinants of health in local communities have a positive impact on your program.
Agenda and Speakers

Lisa Barker

Kevin Robertson

Federal Insight on Brain Health 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Federal Insight on Brain Health

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Overview

Many surveys of older adults show that Alzheimer's disease and cognitive health rated among the public's biggest health concerns. As aging professionals, you may be wondering what role you can play in helping older adults keep their brains (and the rest of their bodies) healthy, you may be eager to offer more programming related to brain health to attract younger older adults, or you may be interested in expanding your current programming efforts. By attending this session, you will gain the knowledge to do just that. During this session, you will learn what we know in terms of promoting brain health, and what we don't know - but are actively studying. You will hear about the Healthy Brain Initiative's Public Health Road Map Series (RM), which provides a course of action for state, local, and tribal public health agencies and their partners to address brain health, cognitive impairment including Alzheimer's disease, and caregiving for persons with a cognitive impairment, as well as examples of RM activities. You will be provided with examples from across community-based organizations (CBOs) that are delivering services and activities that touch on the topics of brain health and dementia. Finally, you will learn about potential funding opportunities in this area.
Agenda and Speakers

Keri Lipperini

Melinda Kelley

Lisa McGuire

Partner Spotlight: Lyft and Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Partner Spotlight: Lyft 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Ridesharing Safety 101

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Overview

Older adults were Lyft's fastest growing age demographic from 2018-2019, showing that more and more of the 50+ population is embracing ridesharing as a way to get where they're going. A question for people who have never taken rideshare is often, "Is it safe?" Additionally, due to COVID-19, existing riders may also wonder what they need to know about taking a Lyft at this important time for public health. During this session, you'll learn about the policies, programs, and features in place at Lyft to help improve safety in transportation for the older adults you serve.
Agenda and Speakers

Tommy Hayes

Caregiver Wellness: Combatting Compassion Fatigue 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Caregiver Wellness: Combatting Compassion Fatigue

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Overview

Throughout the nation's senior living communities, professional caregivers strive to deliver quality, compassionate care. But they're often at risk of burnout. Physical, emotional, and mental exhaustion can erode their effectiveness in caring not only for residents, but also for themselves. Statistics tell the story of a weary workforce. Each year, an estimated 45 percent of senior care employees leave the industry. Often, caregivers focus so intently on helping others that they neglect themselves. Sleep suffers, diet and exercise are compromised, and even doctor appointments are missed - all of which can contribute to elevated stress, weakened immune systems, and unhealthy employees.
Agenda and Speakers

Stephen Chee

Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health in Older Individuals: It All Matters! 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health in Older Individuals: It All Matters!

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Overview

Social determinants of health (SDOH) are the economic and social conditions in the places where people are born, live, and work that affect health outcomes. Put another way, these are factors that are not inherently health-related, but they have a proven effect on health and wellness. These include things like availability of safe, accessible housing and transportation; adequate nutrition; access to health care services; social isolation; and financial security. While there is a growing recognition of the role of SDOH in health care, SDOH have always been the critical drivers of community living. This session will identify vulnerable older populations and explore how these factors affect and influence their health and well-being. Area agency on aging staff, social workers, health care and public health professionals, and aging and disability specialists will learn of successful interventions, like targeted supportive services, self-management programs, and other health promotion and disease prevention programs that can help produce healthier outcomes.
Agenda and Speakers

Derek Lee

Mehran Massoudi

Isolation is Killing Our Older Adults 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Isolation is Killing Our Older Adults

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Overview

Research has found that lonely people are 50 percent more likely to die prematurely than those who have an engaged social life. When a person goes into their house and closes the door, shutting the world out, it is the beginning of the end for them. There are a number of factors that trigger this downward spiral, like the death of a spouse or the fear of falling. We have vaccinations against a number of illnesses and cures for more illnesses are being found daily, yet this is being overlooked. What can we do to prevent this? Our job is to help the individual find that key that will unlock the doors to their isolation and join in. We will look at a variety of programs to help accomplish this goal to help you better serve your community.
Agenda and Speakers

Jerri Locke

Garden to Plate Nutrition Education for Seniors 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Garden to Plate Nutrition Education for Seniors

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Overview

Founded in 1988, Open Hand Atlanta has been providing home-delivered meals and nutrition education to low-income, homebound individuals such as seniors, those living with HIV/AIDS, and those with kidney failure, heart disease or diabetes who cannot cook for themselves. As the largest community-based provider of medically-tailored meals in the Southeast, we prepare and deliver nearly 5,000 meals daily to eighteen counties across Metro-Atlanta. Guided by our mission, "We cook. We deliver. We teach. We care," our meals and nutrition education, which include individual counseling and group classes, help eliminate knowledge barriers to healthy food access by teaching people about the connection between food choices and overall health, and giving them tools for providing healthy meals for themselves on a limited budget. Throughout 2017, through local funding, Open Hand began utilizing tools and outcomes obtained in Cooking Matters nutrition education classes and prepared a similar curriculum that urges seniors out into a garden located at their senior center called Garden-to-Plate for Seniors. This Garden-to-Plate curriculum addresses food insecurity among seniors and improves seniors' nutrition knowledge, so that they have the information and skills needed to make healthier food choices. Course lessons are tailored for low-income seniors and highlight topics such as seasonality, local food systems, and preparing healthy recipes on a budget. Seniors get the opportunity to practice preparing recipes during a short cooking lesson and receive produce at the end of each lesson to practice preparing healthy meals on their own. In this curriculum, a local urban farmer visits the class to share their knowledge of local agriculture and the history of their farm. At the end of each class, the Dietitian leads the group to their center's community garden where they discuss and practice weeding, composting, and harvesting vegetables, fruit, and herbs. If funding is available and needed by the senior center, we were able to build raised garden beds prior to the class starting. This provides the seniors with new access to local, organic produce and hands on experiences to gardening. During our 2019 grant period, we taught this curriculum to four senior centers reaching over 100 seniors. We assisted these sites with preparing and cultivating their gardens to grow organic produce and herbs. At the end of their 6-week session, we found a 15% increase in confidence levels in the garden (their confidence was already high), they were more likely to visit a farmer's markets more frequently and ate 1-2 more fruits and vegetables at home. 
Agenda and Speakers

Aleta McLean

Laura Samnadda

Michelle Kuntz

Breaking Through Clinic Walls: Leveraging an Existing System to Enable Provider Referrals
to Aging Services 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Breaking Through Clinic Walls: Leveraging an Existing System to Enable Provider Referrals to Aging Services

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Overview

Champions of services for elders and people with disabilities often hear the refrain from medical providers that the clinic walls are just too thick, and for a myriad of interconnected reasons many providers can't seem to get their patients into health promotion programs that would improve their lives. Yet some providers do manage to make these referrals, and see the benefits to their patients. How can we replicate that success by simplifying and incentivizing the process? That is the question that healthy aging professionals in Washington aimed to explore in their journey to developing an electronic referral pathway from providers to aging and disability resource centers. The target audience for this presentation is community based organizations, local and state-level agencies who serve older adults and people with disabilities. The goal of this presentation is to share the process, products and data from Washington's provider referral site that are breaking through roadblocks and successfully connecting more people to services. We will outline the decision-making process that Washington state undertook to select a referral pathway system, the journey to effective outreach and a brief analysis of data collected in the first six months of activation. From 2018-2019, staff at the Washington State Department of Health and Aging and Long Term Support Administration evaluated options to enable direct electronic referrals from providers in the community into falls prevention programs, chronic disease self-management and other services offered at the the state's thirteen area agencies on aging. Staff heard significant response feedback from providers, such as physicians, emergency medical services and physical therapists, that their patients have multiple social service needs but providers don't have time to familiarize themselves with what is offered in their community. Based on the importance of balancing provider needs and simplifying referral processing at the agency staff level, Washington state made an informed choice to build upon existing infrastructure. This option resulted in a creation of a unique, HIPPA-compliant, open site for referrals at www.waclc.org/patientreferral. The cost for building out the site was significantly less than other options, allowing for more funds for expanding access to programs. Working with partners at AAAs, healthcare organizations and state agencies, DOH and ALTSA leveraged existing innovative programs and developed flexible educational materials about the site to increase utilization. Since becoming active, the referral site has sent referrals directly from many provider types in the community to Information and Assistance Staff at Aging and Disability Resource Centers across the state. The site also collects data on the type, location and volume of referrals made, allowing state and local level partners to evaluate usage and highlight areas of need. Next steps being pursued are to complete the loop with bi-directional referrals so that providers can receive confirmation and feedback. By learning from the Washington state experience, we hope to help others think outside the box about how to make electronic referrals happen with varied levels of resources, and to help them use the data to make the case internally for this type of referral mechanism.
Agenda and Speakers

Carolyn Ham

Eliticia Sanchez

Dawn Shuford-Pavlich

How Ethel Got Her Groove Back: Group Exercise to Restore Walking Expertise 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

How Ethel Got Her Groove Back: Group Exercise to Restore Walking Expertise

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Overview

Walking is a skill essential to many daily activities and is developed throughout a lifetime. The loss of walking skill that occurs with aging is a common and costly problem, affecting more than a third of the people 65 years of age or older. On the Move (OTM), a novel group exercise program designed to target key principles of the biomechanics and motor control of walking, was designated as an Evidence-based program by the National Council on Aging in 2018. The OTM program contains unique stepping and walking patterns that were designed to promote the timing and coordination of movement critical for skilled walking. Though seen as a challenging exercise program, OTM can be tailored to different ability levels and can be made more difficult as a person improves. The ability to progress the program and make it more challenging was initially perceived as both a negative and a positive aspect of the program by different providers. Due to the challenging nature of the program and the potential risk, some providers were hesitant to offer OTM. Education on 1) appropriate dosing of exercise to obtain results, 2) preferences of the older adult clients, and 3) procedures and recommendations to facilitate safety was critical to the successful implementation of OTM in these facilities. The ability of OTM to be progressed and the ability to challenge higher functioning older adults was attractive to some providers who had a more athletic clientele. During this presentation we plan to share our experiences developing, testing and implementing OTM and the insights we, as academic researchers, gained through our collaborations with our community partners. The specific goals of this presentation are to 1) describe OTM and the importance of stakeholder input in the development of the program, 2) report the research evidence supporting the effectiveness of OTM, 3) provide examples of barriers and facilitators to implementing OTM in the real world, and 4) discuss future plans and directions of the On the Move program. The presentation will include findings from our Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) funded randomized trial and examples of academic and community collaborations (i.e. community-based participatory research). The target audience is evidence-based program coordinators, senior center directors, or anyone who is interested in learning about a new exercise program designed to restore walking expertise to help Ethel get her groove back.
Agenda and Speakers

Jennifer Brach

Leslie Coffman

Valerie Shuman

Navigating the Intricacies of Benefits Enrollment in Indian Country 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Navigating the Intricacies of Benefits Enrollment in Indian Country

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Overview

In this presentation we will go over the intricacies of working as a Benefits Enrollment Center (BEC) in a border-town which also provides services to Native Americans on and off the reservation. We be covering the five core benefits and how to navigate benefits issues affecting Native Americans. We will also go over the community benefits waiver in New Mexico and how that helps older adults of the Pueblos community. We will discuss MSP and how Native Americans are enrolled in one of the MSP programs while they wait to receive their waiver approval. Lastly, we will highlight Medicaid/Medicalized Adult Day Care in Rio Arriba County, where the BEC will be partnering with the City of Española and Santa Clara Pueblo to provide services for non-natives and urban natives. This session is for benefits enrollment staff, SNAP grantees and anyone interested in the intricacies of navigating benefits related issues when assisting individuals on and off Native American reservations.
Agenda and Speakers

Clarissa Durán

Randy Feliciano

Valarie Johnson

Lyle Lomayma

Benita McKerry

Bingocize® LIVE

Bingocize® LIVE 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.

Bingocize®

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Overview

More information and instructions

Exercise can help prevent chronic diseases and falls in older adults, but unfortunately, less than 15% of older adults exercise regularly. Many older adults report that traditional exercise programs are not enjoyable, leading to inactivity and related health issues. Bingocize® offers a unique solution that mixes exercise, health education, and bingo to help overcome health problems in participants across the entire spectrum of care. It’s completely adaptable for all types of facilities and is beneficial for all ranges of physical and mental ability. Evidence shows social, cognitive, and physical improvements from doing Bingocize®, and the best part is that it's fun and affordable!