Tuesday, June 9th - All Times EST

Breakfast & Boogie

Breakfast & Boogie 9:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Breakfast & Boogie

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Fireside Chat Session and COVID-19 TownHall 10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Fireside Chat Session and COVID-19 TownHall 10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Fireside Chat Session and COVID-19 TownHall

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Overview

Fireside Chat
Lance Robertson, Assistant Secretary for Aging and Administration for Community Living Administrator

COVID 19 TownHall - NCOA Making an Impact in Communities
Fireside Chat Speakers

Lance Robertson

Josh Hodges, Moderator

COVID-19 Townhall Speakers

Abigail Zapote

Carrie Schonlaw

Brenda Risch

Moderator: Vivian Nava-Schellinger

Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

The Potential of Ride-Hailing Services and Self-Driving Vehicles to Address Unmet
Transportation Needs in Older Adults 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

The Potential of Ride-Hailing Services and Self-Driving Vehicles to Address Unmet Transportation Needs in Older Adults

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Overview

By 2025, approximately 1 in 5 drivers will be age 65 or older, and research has found that they outlive their decision to stop driving by about 10 years for women and 7 years for men. Older adults rely on private automobiles for transportation, either as drivers or as passengers. However, they face the highest crash risk per mile driven of any group except teenagers, but if they stop driving, they face limited transportation options. When mass transit is available, the age-related changes that make driving a challenge for older adults also make traditional transit systems difficult to navigate. Older adults without transportation become isolated, which can be detrimental to their health and social well-being. Older non-drivers make 15% fewer trips to the doctor than older drivers and 65% fewer trips for social, family, and religious activities. Many older adults require high touch personal service to travel safely and actively engage in their communities. In this presentation, NCOA will describe two innovative approaches that add to the collective understanding of the potential of ride-hailing services and self-driving vehicles to fill major voids in our nation’s transportation system for older adults.
Agenda and Speakers

Maureen O'Leary

Jennifer Tripken

Dianne Stone

Maureen Glaser

Finding Those Most Vulnerable: New Data on Older Adults Least Likely to Access MSP,
LIS, and SNAP 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Finding Those Most Vulnerable: New Data on Older Adults Least Likely to Access MSP, LIS, and SNAP

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Overview

NCOA’s Center for Benefits Access helps low-income Medicare beneficiaries access the 5 core benefits through community & online solutions. Half of Medicare beneficiaries have incomes at or below ~200% FPL, but if an older adult is enrolled in all 5 core benefits the average annual value is over $12,000. The core benefits help low-income older adults afford health care, prescription drugs, food, and utilities. This session will provide an overview of the current state of senior poverty in the country. Following the overview we will drill down on why older adults are missing out on these valuable benefit programs and focus on how to identify these older adults in your community. We will present new data about the older adults least likely to access the Medicare Savings Programs (MSP), Extra Help (Part D Low Income Subsidy/LIS), and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).
Agenda and Speakers

Erin Kee McGovern

Susan Silberman

Kenneth Rosenkranz

Normal Aging versus Alzheimer’s: When to Connect to Resources 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Normal Aging versus Alzheimer’s: When to Connect to Resources

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Overview

Do the people you serve have trouble remembering things from time to time? Have you ever had a client misplace items, but retraced steps to find them? That might just be normal aging. So when should you be concerned? This presentation will address the difference between typical age-related changes and Alzheimer’s disease. One in 10 people age 65 and older is living with Alzheimer's dementia and someone in the United States develops this disease every 65 seconds. As the number of older Americans grows rapidly, so too will the need for professionals, senior center leaders, and other community members to recognize the warning signs of dementia and direct their clients to appropriate resources. Alzheimer’s and other dementias cause changes in memory, thinking, and behaviors that interfere with daily life. During this presentation, Elaine Scholly will explore typical age-related changes, common warning signs of Alzheimer’s, and how to approach someone about memory concerns. Kelly Wilmore will then provide an in-depth overview of nation-wide resources provided by the Alzheimer’s Association including the 24/7 Helpline, Care Consultations, Education Programs, Caregiver Support Groups, and more. After the presentation, participants will be able to: Describe typical age-related memory, thinking or behavior changes. Recognize common warning signs of Alzheimer’s and dementia. Discuss the tips for approaching someone about memory concerns. Name the resources available through the Alzheimer’s Association.
Agenda and Speakers

Elaine Scholly

Kelly Wilmore

Integrating Evidence-Based Programs and Social Determinants of Health for Increased
Community Wellness 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Integrating Evidence-Based Programs and Social Determinants of Health for Increased Community Wellness

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Overview

Partners in Care Foundation has a 16-year history of developing and implementing evidence-based health and wellness programs across Los Angeles County and the state of California. In the past few years we have begun to integrate evidence-based programs with initiatives that help to meet the social determinants of health (SDOH) needs of our community members, including: 1) increasing access to healthy food, 2) decreasing medication interactions and duplication through HomeMedsSM, 3) increasing social connectedness with Wellness Clubs, and 4) working towards a pilot to provide non-medical transportation to evidence-based programming. This type of innovation requires the development of shared values within a team and within partnerships with other organizations. There must be a willingness to take on new work and “stay the course” with a positive attitude. A crucial part of integrating each of these SDOH initiatives was through developing partnerships with outside agencies (governmental, community based and foundations), planning for and collecting needs assessment data, and developing processes for providing participants with the SDOH services that will help them live healthier lives. This presentation will discuss what is required to be an innovation leader, present the successes and barriers we have encountered and how we have addressed those barriers. 
Agenda and Speakers

Dianne Davis

Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Data, Data, Data: The How, What, and Why of Data Exchange Between States,
Medicare/ Medicaid, and Social Security 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Data, Data, Data: The How, What, and Why of Data Exchange Between States, Medicare/ Medicaid, and Social Security

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Overview

Medicaid and Medicare Savings Programs provide payment for Medicare premiums, Medicare cost-sharing and eligibility for Extra Help. What happens after clients apply for Medicare Savings Program benefits at their local Medicaid agency? How does the information get verified and sent to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)? Why does it take so long for the Social Security Administration (SSA) to stop withdrawing the Medicare Part B premium from individuals’ benefit checks? Counselors often express frustration with the long delays for a decision after a client applies for Medicaid or a Medicare Savings Program. Why do clients in some states receive their benefits quickly while others wait months? There is an abundance of data transmitted behind the scenes that is required when clients apply for benefits. Presenters from CMS and NCOA will provide an overview of the complex data exchange and processes between states, CMS, and SSA to ensure clients receive their benefits in a timely manner. Examples of common client problems will be provided and how attendees can help troubleshoot these issues.
Agenda and Speakers

Sharon Donovan

Leslie Fried

Eye-Friendly: Tips and Tricks for Interacting with Older People with Disabilities 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Eye-Friendly: Tips and Tricks for Interacting with Older People with Disabilities

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Overview

Age-related eye conditions and natural changes in vision can prevent older people from fully participating in many activities. These individuals are sometimes unaware of their visual changes or may be unwilling to disclose their challenges to program staff. Additionally, individuals with age-related visual impairments may be unaware of what types of accommodations would help, or even that they can request an accommodation. Professionals will be better prepared to meet vision related challenges of their participants by learning about age-related vision loss and strategies that can help. The four major age-related eye conditions are Macular Degeneration, Glaucoma, Diabetic Retinopathy, and Cataracts. Each condition has a unique pattern for how the vision is effected and this results in a variety of functional challenges. For instance Macular Degeneration causes a central blind spot resulting in difficulty reading and seeing faces, while Glaucoma reduces the peripheral field of vision causing mobility difficulties. Diabetic Retinopathy causes random blind spots and cataracts result in reduced clarity and increased glare. One of the most important tips is to consider light. Is it sufficient? Is it glary? Can the light be adjusted to accommodate a range of needs? Another simple consideration is contrast. Do the chairs stand out from the color of the wall or carpet, or blend in? Is a contrasting table cloth placed under the dinner plates? Are announcements and brochures printed in high contrast? Finally, it is important to consider font style, size, and visual clutter to insure things are available in low vision friendly formats. For those who are blind or have very limited vision, implementing a few basic strategies will help make interactions more comfortable. Descriptive language, the replacement of general words like “over there”, with more specific words like, about 3 feet to your right, will help the individual who does not see the pointing finger understand. Other strategies include: announcing your name, when you enter or leave a room, having group participants introduce themselves, etc. Finally, “Human Guide” is a technique for assisting a person to navigate safely. The individual being guided holds the elbow of the guide and follows about a half step behind the guide. Providing activities, and printed materials in low vision friendly formats will help seniors to more fully participate. Participation reduces isolation and keeps seniors moving and active improving their quality of life.
Agenda and Speakers

Neva Fairchild

Kendra Farrow

Use People Power, Partnerships, and Networks to Fuel Your Creative Aging Program 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Use People Power, Partnerships, and Networks to Fuel Your Creative Aging Program

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Overview

Through the lens of a small arts nonprofit’s programmatic growth over 15 years, this session provides a case study of the benefits and challenges of institutional collaboration and partnership and establishes a model upon which to initiate a creative aging program or scale up an existing one. Target audience for this presentation includes senior center directors, evidence-based program coordinators, and community arts and culture providers. Bihl Haus Arts pioneered creative aging in San Antonio, Texas. From a single art class at the Bihl Haus gallery in 2007, BHA now offers its signature GO! Arts program of free art classes on a year–round basis in multiple arts disciplines at 17 locations around San Antonio. Recently that experience has sustained program extensions to serving the elderly with Alzheimer’s and veterans with PTSD. The Bihl Haus GO! Arts program serves over 400 seniors/week (1,000+ unduplicated clients/year) at 17 senior centers and residences in 9 of 10 council districts. In addition, about 20,000 older adults view GO! Arts semiannual exhibits at these sites primarily located in underserved parts of San Antonio. All participants are over 60, about 80% are women and many are physically challenged. Depending upon the site, 40-90% of participants represent minority groups, mostly Hispanic. All of this growth has been built on partnerships—with local senior-serving organizations (nonprofit and for-profit), the City of San Antonio, the WellMed Charitable Foundation, Alzheimer’s organizations, the veterans-serving community, and academic researchers who have conducted two published studies of the creative aging program and are now marshaling resources to provide a major study of the benefits of arts engagement for veterans. This latter program has also benefited from the oversight of a large and engaged steering committee.
Agenda and Speakers

Kellen McIntyre

How Extension Increases Practical Implementation of Evidence-Based Solutions 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

How Extension Increases Practical Implementation of Evidence-Based Solutions

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Overview

Many organizations seeking to enhance health and wellness of older adults and their families struggle with limited resources. A source of unbiased information and support is needed to bolster the mission of these organizations. Each state is home to a land grant university (i.e., Extension), yet many residents are unaware of these institutions, their mission, or their capacity to connect individuals and communities with evidence-based solutions. The development of Extension began when the Land-Grant College Act of 1862 (Morrill Act) was passed, granting each state land to finance the establishment of a college that provided specialization in agriculture and the mechanical arts. These organizations have a three part mission that include education, research, and outreach. Extension conducts the outreach aspect of the mission. While initially focused on improving agricultural production, Extension has since expanded its focus to include youth development, community development, family and consumer science, as well as health and wellness. The primary purpose of Extension is to translate scientific research to evidence-based solutions to help communities and families identify needs, address problems, enhance their network of partners, and work proactively to prepare for the future. Extension achieves its mission by working with community members and organizations to address critical issues. This presentation will introduce attendees to Extension, describe how Extension is organized in different states, discuss how Extension uses its structure to enhance health and wellness outcomes, describe Extension efforts in North Dakota and South Dakota, and explore how attendees might partner with Extension in their state to increase the capacity of their organization. This presentation is for senior center directors, evidence-based program coordinators, health care system representatives, community education and outreach organizations, public health professionals, and other individuals or organizations that seek to improve a variety of outcomes for older adults. 
Agenda and Speakers

Leacey Brown

Jane Strommen

“Breaking Through”: Reaching LGBT Elders Through the Aging Mastery Program™ 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

“Breaking Through”: Reaching LGBT Elders Through the Aging Mastery Program™

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Overview

Between the aging of the general population and increased social acceptance for LGBT identities, the size of the LGBT older adult population is growing rapidly and expected to more than double by 2030. As a result of historical social and legal mistreatment, LGBT older adults encounter a complex array of social, emotional and physical health needs. In a 2016 research review conducted by the Williams Institute, researchers found that LGBT older adults experienced high risks of mental health issues, disability, and higher rates of disease and physical limitation than their heterosexual counterparts. A needs assessment of LGBT older adults in Philadelphia notes LGBT older adults share many of the same needs as the aging population in general, including healthcare, economic resources, supportive services such as home delivered meals and homecare, affordable housing, and socialization opportunities (PHMC, 2013). However, over 20% of LGBT older adults who participated in the assessment indicated that either they had been or feared they would be treated poorly in a traditional aging service setting (PHMC, 2013). This workshop will describe a recent effort to offer The Aging Mastery Program™ (AMP) specifically for LGBT older adults for the first time in Philadelphia through a collaboration between the LGBT Elder Initiative (LGBTEI), a grassroots advocacy organization, and Center in the Park, a nationally accredited senior center. The LGBTEI is dedicated to building bridges between Aging and LGBT service and community organizations and consumers through advocacy, information, education and referral. Center in the Park (CIP) was one of the first 5 senior centers in the nation to pilot AMP, and is the only aging services provider in the Philadelphia region to offer the program. Developed by the National Council on Aging (NCOA), AMP is a 10-week incentive-based program featuring wellness modules on topics including: physical activity, healthy eating/hydration, navigating longer life, sleeping well, medication management, falls prevention, community engagement, healthy relationships, advance planning, and financial fitness. Participants must complete 7 of 10 modules, track healthy activities, and accumulate points by engaging in healthy behaviors that can be redeemed for incentives. The overarching goals of this collaborative LGBT Aging Mastery pilot are to expand delivery of AMP to improve access to inclusive health promotion programming for LGBT older adults and to increase LGBT participation at CIP. Program graduates were invited to join a newly formed LGBT Advisory Committee to inform future programming at Center in the Park. The project builds on the LGBT Elder Initiative and Center in the Park’s history of collaborating to offer programs that are inclusive for LGBT elders, and was made possible through a Community Innovation Grant from the Independence Blue Cross Foundation.
Agenda and Speakers

Renee Cunningham

Strategies for Integrating Evidence-Based Groups into the Medical System 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Strategies for Integrating Evidence-Based Groups into the Medical System

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Overview

While the evidence-based group programs we implement are proven to have overwhelming positive outcomes on the health of participants, as well as demonstrate a cost saving for institutions, many organizations offering these programs face challenges to integrating those programs into the medical model. Whether we are trying to partner with large healthcare institutions, federally qualified health centers (FQHCs), or other smaller health clinics, many struggle to make the partnership work. This presentation will provide a case study of how an outpatient social work department at a large hospital in Chicago was able to integrate evidence-based programming into both the community and the medical system. The presenters will share best practices and lessons learned from their past 4 years of integrating these programs and building up an overall health and wellness membership program that incorporates a suite of evidence-based programs. First, we will discuss how we adapted our programming to cater to the medical center through 1) utilizing patient data to target our outreach and implementation of community-based programming through two methods of “hot-spotting,” 2) integrating the groups into primary care clinic settings, and 3) creating and managing a referral workqueue integrated into the electronic medical record (EMR) systems for providers to easily send referrals to evidence-based programs. We will discuss this last step in detail, discussing how our social work-centered recruitment approach for both recruitment and retention have been more successful over time. We will also cover 4) how we made the financial return on investment (ROI) argument for maintaining and expanding the workshops and other health promotion programs. This presentation will mostly benefit evidence-based program coordinators and program managers who are either at healthcare institutions hoping to integrate more into the community or at community organizations hoping to integrate more into their nearby health systems. The experience of the presenters may also benefit social workers or other employees at social services agencies that may be considering expanding their programming to include evidence-based programming as part of their service model.
Agenda and Speakers

Grisel Rodríguez-Morales

Padraic Stanley

Leo Laks Awards (12:30 - 2:00 p.m.) and Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Leo Laks Awards Live 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Leo Laks Awards Live

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Overview
Attend the premiere event for senior center professionals. Make new virtual connections, and honor colleagues from across the country. Award winners can host viewing parties to share in the award presentation fun, plus an educational keynote presentation.
Agenda and Speakers

Maureen O'Leary
Elizabeth Bernat
Tracey Colagrossi
Jill Hall
Christine Beatty
Malia Fox
Josh Hodges
Jim Firman
Scott Harlow
David Stevens
Lynn Fields Harris

Ensuring Economic Investments Produce Healthy Outcomes 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Ensuring Economic Investments Produce Healthy Outcomes

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Overview

The health of Americans is not as good as it could be, despite large expenditures on healthcare. Our poorer health status creates costs and challenges for individuals, families, communities, and businesses, and can be a drag on the economy, as too many jobs remain unfilled and productivity is adversely affected. Many of our poor health problems are rooted in inadequate investments in prevention and unequal economic opportunities in our communities. These problems can be more pronounced for older Americans, especially those who may live in rural communities or those who lack transportation. Social workers, health care professionals, and aging and disability specialists will learn the framework of the US Surgeon General’s Community Health and Economic Prosperity model as well as best practices and innovative partnerships across various regions to address healthy outcomes for older individuals.
Agenda and Speakers

Derek Lee

Mehran Massoudi

Collaboration between Villages and Community Partnerships to Promote Thriving
in Community 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Collaboration between Villages and Community Partnerships to Promote Thriving in Community

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Overview

What is a Village? Village-to-Village Network is a rapidly growing model for aging in community. Villages are membership-driven grassroots nonprofit organizations. They coordinate access to affordable services, provide volunteer services including transportation, health and wellness programs and social activities. Villages are based on community needs. What we bring to the aging services network are social infrastructures that support healthy aging, i.e. volunteers, information and referral, proactive programming. Started in 2001 in Boston, the model has grown to over 350 in 42 states in the US. In this seminar we will explore components needed for a successful collaboration to achieve local chapters of Council on Aging enrollment. We will also explore core values and motivators including the involvement of older adults, creating a vibrant community for individuals across economic strata, and for providing abundant options for adults to thrive in community. Perspectives from two successful villages that partner with state COA organizations.
Agenda and Speakers

Barbara Sullivan

Patty Sullivan

Looking Beyond p-values to Assess Effectiveness: Results of a Mixed-methods Evaluation
of the Aging Mastery Program® 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Looking Beyond p-values to Assess Effectiveness: Results of a Mixed-methods Evaluation of the Aging Mastery Program®

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Overview

There is large-scale interest in developing, and documenting impacts of, community-based programs to promote healthy aging and social engagement for diverse older adults. At this presentation, we will share the results of a mixed methods evaluation of the National Council on Aging’s (NCOA) Aging Mastery Program® (AMP) in Los Angeles County. AMP is a comprehensive program that helps older adults and boomers build their own playbook for aging well. Central to the AMP philosophy is the belief that modest lifestyle changes can produce big results. Mastery comes from turning these lifestyle changes into habits that lead to improved health, stronger economic security, enhanced well-being and increased societal participation. A modified randomized wait-list controlled trial (RCT) design was used to examine experimental, quasi-experimental, and dose-response evidence in five senior centers. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline and after the 10-week intervention, self-reporting their overall quality of life, physical health, mental health, and patient activation. At post one-year program completion, written feedback, interviews and focus groups were used to deepen understanding of participant outcomes beyond the findings of the RCT. Experimental, intention-to-treat analyses found AMP assignment did not affect any RCT measured outcomes (quality of life, physical health, mental health and patient activation). Quasi-experimental, “as treated” analyses controlling for study site and socio-demographic characteristics indicated that participants who attended AMP reported more positive changes in global mental health than the control group. Dose-response analyses among AMP participants who attended at least one class found that attending more classes was not significantly associated with greater improvements in mental health. Analysis of written feedback and focus group comments noted that AMP participants enjoyed interacting with other seniors, and learning from the class topics and information provided by the AMP. Although results from the RCT of the AMP in Los Angeles did not support its effectiveness on the measured outcomes, the qualitative analyses uncovered perceived gains, and gains in an additional domain –socialization. This study emphasizes the importance of considering participant-generated and participant self-described outcomes when measuring the effectiveness of successful aging programs. The target audience for this presentation can range from senior center staff to researchers.
Agenda and Speakers

Lourdes Guerrero

Hayoung Kye

What’s New in Nutrition? An Overview of ACL’s Innovations in Nutrition Grant Program
Projects 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

What’s New in Nutrition? An Overview of ACL’s Innovations in Nutrition Grant Program Projects

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Overview

Since 2017, the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Administration on Aging (AoA) has funded pioneering projects to support testing promising practices that look to enhance the quality and effectiveness of nutrition services programs or outcomes within the aging services network. Session participants will have the opportunity to hear exciting information from ACL grantees about their innovative nutrition projects currently in action across the country. Session projects will include, research to identify causes of decline in congregate meal program participation by adults 60 and over; addressing low income, food insecurity, and social isolation barriers by enhancing partnerships and creating a virtual network; and using daily contact with volunteers delivering home delivered meals as an opportunity to improve the wellbeing and quality of life/care of homebound seniors ages 60.
Agenda and Speakers

Ken Bock

Alyssa Guzman

Daphne Brown

Phantane Sprowls

Reaching America: Utilizing Extension Programs that Work in Rural Areas 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Reaching America: Utilizing Extension Programs that Work in Rural Areas

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Overview

Reaching America: Utilizing Extension Programs that work in Rural Areas. Through partnerships and addressing some of the social determinants of health, older adults can be engaged in evidence-based programs. Utilizing extension workers that work with rural communities reaches older adults where they live and desire to age. Addressing falls through evidence-based programs is one strategy so older adults can build skills to continue to live and reside in their communities. Serving older adults in rural areas with lifelong learning and meaningful volunteer opportunities brings the full breadth of engagement throughout the lifespan of rural residents. A Matter of Balance engages older adults to be a part of their health and find solutions to reducing risk factors, communicating with peers and staying active. Meeting people where they reside, eat, worship and visit; it is possible to reach people in their communities. Reducing transportation needs and meeting in areas that are familiar / accessible can help reduce stress and increase participation and engagement.
Agenda and Speakers

Dawn Contreras

Andy Crocker

Patti League

Patti League

Kelsey Weitzel

Breaking into Jail: It's not as easy as it seems 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Breaking into Jail: It's not as easy as it seems

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Overview

Goal: Learn strategies on how to get “into” the system to help those that are incarcerated lead a productive and healthy life both in and out of a correctional facility. One of Healthy Living for ME’s (HL4ME) objectives for the 2018 CDSME (Chronic Disease Self-Management Education) grant is to increase the amount of incarcerated men that take a Self-Management Resource Center (SMRC) Chronic Pain Self-Management Program (CPSMP). We were quickly successful finding a correctional facility to deliver the program however, it took us 6 months to implement due to the many security, back ground checks and trainings. Initially, we had eight participants identified to take the program. When we arrived for our first class there were a total of five. It was decided that the program would continue, as it was a pilot with the Veteran’s block. The following weeks, we came across multiple obstacles that caused us to shift gears and eventually discontinue the program at week 4. Lessons Learned: • Utilizing correctional facilities can result in unpredictable numbers. Those incarcerated are typically paroled between 6 weeks to 6 months. We also were getting new participants past week two. • Many of them have work duties during the day that conflict with the class times. • It was not mandatory for the Veteran’s block to attend CPSMP. Therefore, it was difficult to know how many participants we would have week to week. • Every item that entered into the jail—books, amount of paper, charts, etc.—needed to be accounted for. No pens were allowed and no staples in any of the paperwork that would be handed to participants. • Facilitators were to refrain from wearing jewelry, scarves, heels, accessories, or dresses and were subject to a pat down/scan. • Phones or electronic devices were not allowed and your driver’s license was necessary to enter. We learned that correctional facilities were not going to work for this particular program and sought out other opportunities with the Maine State Prison and other detention/rehabilitation facilities. Through the initial pilot, we were able to ask questions from our lessons learned that we otherwise would not have known. We have also connected with Senator Angus King’s office to assist us in partnering with new facilities and address three unique sub-populations, men, those incarcerated, and opioids. Our network is cultivating these new partnerships to bring CPSMP in the spring of 2020 to two new locations.
Agenda and Speakers

Jennifer Fortin
Wesley Littlefield

A Digital Approach to Self-Management, Bringing Peers Together Online 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

A Digital Approach to Self-Management, Bringing Peers Together Online

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Overview

Please join Neal Kaufman and Katy Plant from Canary Health to learn more about digital self-management programs for people living with a chronic health condition or their caregivers.  This talk will highlight the program’s appeal to potential healthcare partners looking for digital solutions in the time of COVID. Learn how peer self-management programs can complement other service offerings, strategies for increasing the program’s reach and sustainability, and funding options.
Agenda and Speakers

Katy Plant

Neal Kaufman

Kathleen Zuke

Virtual Mocktail - 2:00 p.m. | Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Virtual Mocktail Oral Session - Meet with Dr. Sahni: Why Menopause Matters 2:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Virtual Mocktail Oral Session - Meet with Dr. Sahni: Why Menopause Matters

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Overview

Prepare yourself a healthy “mocktail” and take a few minutes to learn more menopause. It’s time. To change. To change the way we talk about women’s bodies. Everyday 6,000 women reach menopause. While the beginning of menstruation is celebrated as a rite of passage and the arrival of a girl’s womanhood and fertility, menopause is mourned as a loss of youth — a shrinking not only of one’s ovaries, but of one’s self. Its time to change that narrative – and more importantly, fill the void in information that exists for all women. A conversation with Vivian Nava-Schellinger, NCOA, and Dr. Sabrina Sahni on menopausal health, the ways to communicate with your physician, and access to services for women as they age.
Agenda and Speakers

Dr. Sabrina Sahni

Many Hands for Senior Health: How the Paramedics, a Non-Profit, a Hospital, and the
Public Library Started a Movement 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Many Hands for Senior Health: How the Paramedics, a Non-Profit, a Hospital, and the Public Library Started a Movement

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Overview

When a local fire department in California wanted to address reducing falls in older adults, they solicited help from many partners including their local public library, hospital, and a community-based organization. Over the course of three years, the fire department’s referrals into one Matter of Balance workshop evolved into ongoing referrals, an annual fall prevention fair, and a public awareness campaign to spread education about a safety issue common to our aging population. With each partner bringing their skills to the table, free workshops, and free referrals, an ongoing partnership developed. Join this session to learn how Partners in Care Foundation – an ACL Falls Prevention grantee – addressed the problem of falls by joining an innovative partnership. Hear about what each partner learned from each other, and what tips the partners would share toward building a similar collaboration in your community. This session will: address the very real hurdles to a multi-agency partnership (politics, information security, and budget to name a few), detail techniques used to overcome, sidestep, or shrink them, discuss how outcomes were captured, and detail future implications for expansion.
Agenda and Speakers

Christy Lau

Moving Beyond the Boundaries of Traditional Assisted Living 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Moving Beyond the Boundaries of Traditional Assisted Living

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Overview

The New Jersey Assisted Living Program (ALP) was developed to address the increased health and long-term care needs of low-income older adults with limited access to care through traditional, stand-alone assisted living facilities. Through the ALP, residents living in publicly-subsidized senior housing (e.g. HUD Section 202) and public housing can access fully licensed, affordable assisted living services that are traditionally delivered in stand-alone facilities. The ALP model links existing affordable housing with comprehensive assisted living services to improve the health outcomes of these high cost, high need residents. Research indicates that residents in publicly-subsidized and public housing have increasing health needs as they age and experience greater health disparities (Lewin, 2017). Current efforts to demonstrate the impact and value of housing with service models for low income older adults have found that integration and coordination of care leads to better health outcomes and quality of life for older adults. The ALP model provides the ability to support more effective management of complex care needs as well as reduce premature institutionalization. Through the ALP, low income older residents are able to age in the community and access higher levels of care adding an opportunity to go beyond the traditional wrap around support services provided through service coordination or home health care aides. With an average annual income of a public housing senior of $10,000, these older adults are often priced out of access to traditional assisted living facilities making skilled nursing facilities their default long term care option. By removing the building from the model, the services can be easily delivered in an efficient way to a very hard to serve population. Care provided is based on the individual needs of each participant in a manner that promotes their individuality, dignity, privacy, choice, and independence including all support with activities of daily living, intermittent nursing and medication assistance. Together, The Henry and Marilyn Taub Foundation, Capital Impact Partners, Rutgers University and the current ALP Providers are evaluating the impact of the model on health outcomes and cost, supporting a statewide ALP provider collaborative, and raising awareness of the model among key stakeholders, including managed care organizations and affordable and public housing providers. This workshop will provide an opportunity for participants gain a better understanding of key challenges and barriers to providing assisted living to very low income older adults; demonstrate an understanding of the Assisted Living Program model as it relates to the support of complex care needs for very low income residents living independently in publicly subsidized and public housing; gain a better understanding of the initial evaluation results of the model and the impact of the model on key metrics; and, create a space for deeper discussion with participants on how this model could be scaled and replicated into other states.
Agenda and Speakers

Elizabeth Davis

Candace Robinson

Julia Stoumbos

Karen Zurlo

Our Journey to Main Street 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Our Journey to Main Street

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Overview

Operated by Living Well in Wabash CoA (County Council on Aging) Inc. in Wabash, IN, Winchester Senior Center is tucked discretely on the outskirts of town. Despite being out of site, its presence is strongly felt and valued in the community. A shortage of space and lack of visibility, the CoA had been watching for a sustainable opportunity to gain a senior center presence in the vibrant downtown. With new senior housing coming as part of a high profile downtown revitalization project, the CoA saw an opportunity to establish a "Main Street" presence. The CoA proposed collaboration to the contractor and operator to create a satellite lifelong learning/senior center adjacent to the new senior housing in the heart of downtown Wabash. The CEO will describe the process from idea to ribbon cutting and how the project was used to raise awareness of what senior accessibility is. The CEO will present a candid look at the opportunities and challenges that impacted funding, design, construction, schedule, and budget along the way. The result is a truly accessible and senior-friendly constructed space within a hundred year-old building. The senior design specialist will talk about key issues in designing for adaptive reuse and the roadblocks encountered with contractors and suppliers not understanding senior friendly design. Senior Center professionals will gain insight into the potential benefits of satellite locations that offer both a supplement and alternative to your "main" center as well as collaborations and non-traditional funding. The costs and challenges of constructing and operating a satellite facility within an existing tenant space will be openly discussed to demystify the process while highlighting pitfalls to avoid and safeguards to adopt. A basic primer in essential design features for a facility that is universally welcoming and comfortable for everyone in your organization's target population will help to support your proactive review of the desirability of potential satellite locations.
Agenda and Speakers

Beverly Ferry

Doug Gallow

Medicare Advantage: Laying the Groundwork for Emerging CBO Opportunities 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Medicare Advantage: Laying the Groundwork for Emerging CBO Opportunities

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Overview

Join Medicare experts to learn about the basics of Medicare Advantage Plans (MAPs) - types of plans, landscape of supplemental benefits, structure, quality ratings, accreditation, and more. Attendees will gain an understanding of the new Medicare Advantage Special Supplemental Benefits for the Chronically Ill and other opportunities for community-based organizations (CBO) to partner with MAPs. Considerations and issues for CBO readiness for engagement with MAPs will also be explored.
Agenda and Speakers

Kathleen Cameron

Jeremiah McCoy

Sharon Williams

America's Institutional Infrastructure to Advance Creative Aging 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

America's Institutional Infrastructure to Advance Creative Aging

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Overview

The academic and professional field of creative aging is growing dramatically as the aging baby boomer cohort both in the United States and around the world demands a high quality of life in their senior years - a period of time that commonly spans three or four decades. Despite the enormous potential of the arts to engage older adults in educational, enrichment, and therapeutic programs, few resources exist to support cultural organizations, artists, and healthcare institutions in designing and implementing arts in health and arts for wellness programs for this population group. A robust array of arts education concepts, theories, and practices have evolved over many decades for K-12 education, but scant scholarship exists for arts education in lifelong learning for older adults. Similarly, the lack of research on arts participation and cultural engagement for people over the age of 60 is striking, given the size and economic/political power of this demographic group. It is the right time to systematically identify a solid public policy infrastructure to undergird the creative aging movement. There is an urgent need for research that contributes to the theory and practice of lifelong learning in the arts as well as to a public policy agenda and strategies for cultural engagement that support creative aging. Three of America's leading academics in the fields of arts in health (Lambert), arts education (Blandy), and cultural policy (Wyszomirski) have joined forces to develop a book titled Arts Education and Cultural Engagement for Creative Aging, which is under contract with Oxford University Press. This groundbreaking book project will address a pressing need for resources on this topic and will contribute to a new interdisciplinary research trajectory taking shape across the fields of medicine, public health, health humanities, healthcare administration, social work, creative and expressive arts therapy, arts management, and arts education. The NCOA presentation, given by the book's primary author, will focus specifically on framing and mapping the institutional ecology of the creative aging domain. Prof. Patricia Lambert will begin with a typology of creative aging programs and activities, mapping the formal and informal organizations within which these programs take place. She will describe the institutions, professional associations, educational resources, funding streams, and other networks that support creative aging across the public, nonprofit, and for-profit sectors. Creative aging will be depicted as a fragmented and decentralized field of engagement, both in the United States and internationally. After mapping the associational infrastructure that supports this domain of public policy and creative practice throughout the United States, the presentation will apply theories of network governance and multi-level governance to construct an advocacy coalition framework for scholars and practitioners to more effectively coordinate their efforts in developing the field. This session is designed for anyone interested in the ways that creating aging policy and practice can contribute toward healthy aging across the nation. By attending this session, conference participants will gain "big picture" understanding of the associational infrastructure that is currently influencing public policies to support creative aging programs and initiatives.
Agenda and Speakers

Patricia Lambert

Inspiring Change: Developing the Caregiver Workforce of Our Future 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Inspiring Change: Developing the Caregiver Workforce of Our Future

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Overview

THE PROBLEM According to the US Census Bureau (2014), the population of people 65 and older will nearly double from 47.8 million in 2015 to 88 million in 2050. This rapidly growth will drive demand for direct caregivers to provide personal assistance and health care support in homes and community-based settings. While the Direct Care Workforce has nearly doubled in the past decade, employers struggle to attract adequate numbers of caregivers, as evidenced by growing workforce shortages. Inadequate preparation, undervaluation, low wages and other barriers lead to turnover rates above 80%[1]. INNOVATIVE POLICY CHANGE Arizona’s Medicaid agency AHCCCS (AZ Health Care Cost Containment System) created an approach for generating realistic and impactful workforce solutions. AHCCCS developed a policy (ACOM 407) that requires health plans to maintain a workforce development (WFD) operation which must be capable of forecasting, monitoring, assessing, and offering assistance to the provider community. AHCCCS also requires the health plans use their WFD capabilities to independently strengthen the workforce of their networks as well as the entire long term care labor force. UNIQUE COLLABORATION Mercy Care, Aetna’s Medicaid/AHCCCS health plan serving Arizona, has been exploring opportunities to partner with outside agencies to strengthen this Direct Care Workforce and improve outcomes for members. The health plan is implementing Workforce Training and Development initiatives that will support the creation of 6,000 - 10,000 new direct care positions. The payor will collaborate with the United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona (UWTSA) to identify people in the community who are interested in direct care work, and Pima Care at Home (PCAH) to provide enhanced caregiver training and certification. UWTSA’s partnership for older adults, The ELDER Alliance, is a coalition dedicated to ensuring adults 60+ living in Pima County thrive. The Alliance has Action Teams which target specific areas. The DIrect Care Workforce Action Team will provide neutral support for potential caregivers as well as oversight and guidance to achieve the Mercy Care project objectives. UWTSA will use a Community Health Worker model to recruit potential Direct Care Workers (DCWs) with a focus on underserved areas. DCWs will receive financial aid for pre-training requirements and barriers to employment as well as peer support. Pima Care at Home, a program of Pima Council on Aging and an Arizona Long Term Care System (ALTCS) contractor will provide enhanced caregiver training to individuals identified through UWTSA. The strong foundation offered by this educator will better prepare individuals for employment, increase their likelihood of placement, improve the quality of care for recipients and aid in retention. The enriched program increases training hours, implements hands-on experience, expands knowledge of durable medical equipment and technology. Modules will be offered in both English and Spanish languages. ENDGAME It is anticipated that these efforts will help expand a qualified Direct Care Workforce. The outcomes of these initiatives will be analyzed with the hope that the pilots will help guide future efforts in the state and beyond. TARGET AUDIENCE Health Plans, Workforce Development Programs, Caregiver Agencies, Community Based Organizations, Care Facilities.

Agenda and Speakers

Elizabeth Cozzi

Sarah Hauck

Bill Kennard

Rebekah McGee

National Health Care Fraud Trends 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

National Health Care Fraud Trends

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Overview

During this session, Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP) program representatives will provide an overview of the mission and work of the 54 state-based Senior Medicare Patrol programs in preventing, detecting, reporting, and processing healthcare fraud complaints. The session will include common and emerging health care fraud schemes impacting the Medicare, Medicaid, and private health insurance programs. Specialty fraud topics will also be discussed - including criminal enterprises, medical identity theft, and patient harm. The recent trends of genetic testing and COVID-19 fraud will be highlighted, including ways that individuals can protect themselves and their loved ones from becoming victims of these and other health care fraud schemes.
Agenda and Speakers

Rebecca Kinney

Jennifer Trussell

Marissa Whitehouse

Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Medicare for Today: Program Highlights for 2020 and Beyond 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Medicare for Today: Program Highlights for 2020 and Beyond

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Overview

As we enter a new decade, healthcare is facing unprecedented opportunities for better health outcomes here and across the globe. In 2020, as the demographic of a "typical" Medicare beneficiary is changing, we see a change in expectations for both the program and its providers/stakeholders/advocates. In keeping with these changes, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is creating and implementing never-before-covered services (such as coverage for vision, hearing and dental treatments) and additional choices for the way in which people with Medicare receive their services. This session will provide education on the program which serves over 60 million individuals in 2020, including knowledge on Medicare basics; and discussion on how Medicare is responding to the healthcare needs of the disabled of any age, and the booming number of persons aging into the program. It is imperative that caregivers, advocates and providers have the most current, unbiased information and resources available to assist in providing whole-person care for these clients. The goal of this session is for attendees to leave with the Medicare tools needed for successful outreach and referral, resulting in positive healthcare results for those whom they serve.
Agenda and Speakers

Sylvia Gary

Gaye Humphrey

Introduction to the Self-Management Resource Center Suite of Chronic Disease
Self-Management Education Programs 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Introduction to the Self-Management Resource Center Suite of Chronic Disease Self-Management Education Programs

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Overview

Millions of adults live with one or more chronic health conditions. The suite of chronic disease self-management education (CDSME) programs, originally developed by Stanford University and now managed by the Self-Management Resource Center, help people and their caregivers manage their symptoms, improve their quality of life, and reduce health care costs. During this session, Dr. Kate Lorig will provide an introduction to the programs and a basic description of training and implementation. This session is intended for individuals that are not familiar with CDSME programs and have limited or no experience implementing them. We will discuss the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program, Diabetes Self-Management Program, Chronic Pain Self-Management and Building Better Caregivers.
Agenda and Speakers

Kate Lorig

Virginia Gonzales

Kathleen Zuke

The Virtual Care Farm Concept: Addressing Loniless and Building Community for
Older Adults 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

The Virtual Care Farm Concept: Addressing Loniless and Building Community for Older Adults

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Overview

In this presentation, we will introduce and describe the Days@Dunrovin program (D@D), the first "virtual care farm". D@D is a subscription-based, content-driven, social media platform that captures life at Dunrovin Ranch in rural Lolo, Montana. D@D offers an exclusive "cyber front porch" where members engage with ranch life in real time via web cameras, audio systems, protected social media, and intentional programming. Members are able to view all of the ranch operations and, equally important, engage with each other through technology and shared experiences. The goals of D@D are to create community, to address loneliness, to provide educational opportunities, and to connect older adults to with nature, and to facilitate social bonds. In additional to describing this creative program, the presenters will also review the findings from an initial qualitative evaluation of the experiences of D@D members. Findings from this initial evaluation indicate that D@D has the ability to facilitate social engagement, foster relationships and build community, and address loneliness and isolation (Anderson, 2019).
Agenda and Speakers

Keith Anderson

SuzAnne Miller

The Impact of the Opioid Epidemic on Older Adults and Persons with Disabilities 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

The Impact of the Opioid Epidemic on Older Adults and Persons with Disabilities

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Overview

To gain insight into how the opioid epidemic is affecting the aging service network and the older adults they serve, NCOA surveyed its aging services network of grantees and partners. The survey was intended to understand how older adults and their caregivers are affected by the opioid epidemic and identify new resources and tools needed for organizations to better serve their communities. This session will present the study findings, recommendations and next steps. The Administration for Community Living will also highlight the key activities they are engaged in to address the opioid crisis as it relates to older adults and persons with disabilities.
Agenda and Speakers

Kathleen Cameron

Shannon Skowronski

Partnering with Public Libraries to Offer Physical Activity Programs for Older Adults 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Partnering with Public Libraries to Offer Physical Activity Programs for Older Adults

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Overview

Public libraries are increasingly becoming hosting sites for physical activity programs for older adults. According to public health scholars at the University of Pennsylvania, 66% of Pennsylvania libraries support patrons' interest in exercise (Whiteman et al. 2018). Research shows that "peer-based strategies to support physical activity for older adults can be implemented in a variety of different settings ... [including] community location[s] like a Council on Aging or public library" (Matz-Costa 2018, p. 5). Nonetheless, despite increasing scholarly recognition of this role, this trend has received limited scholarly attention. This study begins to rectify this situation by reporting on a 12-week exercise program for older adults that was offered from January to April 2019 (24 classes total) in 49 small and rural public libraries throughout the U.S. in which 535 older adults (completers) used a video-based version of the evidence-based physical activity program called "Geri-Fit®". The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a video-led exercise intervention in public libraries and to extend access to opportunities for active living among older adults and disabled older adults living in small and rural communities. In Fall 2018, public librarians were invited to participate in this study through the networks of the Association for Rural & Small Libraries and Let's Move in Libraries. After completing an online training program, public librarians administered the 12-week, video-based Geri-Fit program either in the library's meeting room or other open space. At the conclusion of the program, older adults filled out a three-page survey that asked about health and wellness outcomes. Overall, older adult participants indicated that the program had the greatest impact on their strength and on their general wellbeing. 94% said the program raised their spirits and put them in a better mood and 78% said their overall strength had increased. Public libraries from 17 states participated in this study: 92% serve communities with populations under 13,000, including 65% that serve populations under 5,000. This study found that increasing opportunities for strength training programs in small and rural public libraries impacts both physical and mental health, by increasing opportunities for socialization and bonding in a trusted community space. Public librarians also reported strong support: 97% intend to continue offering exercise programs at their libraries, and 97% of the older adults who participated said they would recommend it to a friend. 
Agenda and Speakers

Francesca Fisher 

Noah Lenstra

Lessons Learned: Enhancing Behavioral Health Competencies for Senior Center Staff 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Lessons Learned: Enhancing Behavioral Health Competencies for Senior Center Staff

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Overview

As the population ages, so come increases in the numbers of older adults with behavioral health concerns. Untreated mental health and substance use conditions are associated with a wide range of negative effects, including emotional distress, functional disability, reduced physical health, increased mortality and suicide (IOM, 2012). One of the greatest barriers to the provision of behavioral health services is the lack of a trained workforce. To address this issue, the Center for Aging and Disability Education and Research (CADER) at Boston University's School of Social Work, developed a 19-hour, online certificate in Behavioral Health and Aging. The online courses included are: 1) Mental Health and Aging; 2) Substance Use among Older Adults; 3) Mental Wellness and Resilience Among Older Immigrants and Refugees; 4) Suicide Prevention among Older Adults; and 5) Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias. CADER and NCOA have already trained almost 200 senior center staff and preliminary results show that 94% of participants had a greater understanding of how and where to make referrals for behavioral health services such as mental health and recovery support after completing this program. Additionally, 90% of the participants "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that the information in the training program was effectively presented. Further, almost 94% reported that because of this training program, they believe they will be a more effective worker in serving older adults with behavioral health concerns. Pre to post competency scores are statistically significant across all courses. This session will focus on the collaboration between CADER and NCOA to train 250 senior center staff across Florida, Illinois and Wisconsin. This workshop will outline the specific courses included in this program, why they are important, and how this program can improve staff competencies. Information about funding sources, partnerships, and ways to replicate the program will also be discussed.
Agenda and Speakers

Bronwyn Keefe

Rita Marsh

Maureen O'Leary

Jennifer Tripken

Tracey Colagrossi

Your Wellness Your Way: Promoting Behavioral Health Self-Management in Illinois 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Your Wellness Your Way: Promoting Behavioral Health Self-Management in Illinois

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Overview

This presentation describes a statewide collaboration bringing peer-taught, evidence-based, mental health self-management education to older adults in Illinois. It tells the story of how a university is working with 2 state agencies, their service systems, and constituencies to address the significant unmet mental and physical healthcare needs of seniors in community settings. The innovative project deploys a peer workforce of certified health educators to cross disciplinary boundaries and bridge the separation of mind and body that characterizes the way we think about health mental and emotional aging.
Agenda and Speakers

Judith Cook

Sean Johnson

Jessica Jonikas

Opportunity for Collaboration: The Intersection Between the Work of a Veterans Services
Officer and a Benefits Enrollment Center 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Opportunity for Collaboration: The Intersection Between the Work of a Veterans Services Officer and a Benefits Enrollment Center

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Overview

The goal of this presentation is to inform and encourage Benefits Enrollment Centers (BECs) to pursue relationships with their area Veterans Services Officers (VSOs) and to pursue certification as a VSO to help enhance the services they provide to aging Veterans. In this presentation participants will hear from a panel of experts to include: two BECs who specialize in serving veterans and who have on staff VSOs who work for the BEC. The panel will also include a state veterans administration VSO, who will speak on how he works closely with the BEC, and a local Veteran from Texas who will share his view on the needs of aging veterans from a Veterans perspective. The target audience for this session includes: BEC staff, Veterans service providers and federal agency partners involved in benefits for Veterans.
Agenda and Speakers

Deborah Crowther 

Janeil Esplin

Randy Feliciano

Courtney Pendleton

Kristina Raner

Symposium and Falls Prevention Coalition - 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

NCOA - Nationwide: Health, Wellness, and Financial Security 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Health, Wellness, and Financial Security

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Overview

Today's 65-year-old can expect to live another 20 years, according to the Social Security Administration. Unlike their parents and grandparents, today's pre-retirees and retirees face a vastly different retirement security landscape. Longer lives and lower savings are fueling a retirement security crisis for millions of American's workers. Join us for an active discussion regarding what to expect as well as tools and solutions available to American's retirees to help decrease longevity risk.
Agenda and Speakers

Kristi Rodriguez

Josh Hodges

Susan Silberman

Marc Cohen

The Falls Prevention Coalition Gathering5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

The Falls Prevention Coalition Gathering

Overview

Once again we are bringing together the Falls Prevention State Coalition Leaders to network and share ideas for Falls Prevention Awareness Week in September. We are continuing this successful tradition in a virtual format and look forward to an empowering session. This event is for pre-registered individuals. For additional information, contact conferences@ncoa.org.