Monday, June 8th - All Times EST

Breakfast & Boogie

Breakfast & Boogie 9:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Breakfast & Boogie

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Opening Kick Off - 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Age+Action Virtual Conference Kickoff 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Age+Action Virtual Conference Kickoff

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Agenda and Speakers

Jim Knickman

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Joe Coughlin

Center for Health Aging Plenary - 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Center for Healthy Aging Plenary 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Center for Healthy Aging Plenary

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Overview

Virtual Meet & Greet with the Administration for Community Living

Strength in Numbers: Developing Collaboration Among States

Agenda and Speakers

Virtual Meet & Greet with the Administration for Community Living:

Keri Lipperini

Shannon Skowronski

Phantane Sprowls

Monique Bolton

Judy Simon

Strength in Numbers: Developing Collaboration Among States

Kristin Overton

Jennifer Raymond

Sherry Ostrout

Jasmine Franco

National Institute of Senior Centers Plenary Session - 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

National Institute of Senior Centers Plenary Session 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

NISC Welcomes National Senior Center Leadership Collaborative Members

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Overview

Join the NISC Chair, Elizabeth Bernat as she welcomes newly appointed Senior Center Leadership Collaborative Members. The goal of the Collaborative is to create a cohesive national, senior center network organized to participate in a collaborative learning environment to share best practices, national initiatives, strategies and resources to spur innovation and to identify national senior center leaders. 

NISC appointed state collaborative members are tasked with sharing promising practices from their state, learning from other state leaders, learning about NCOA and NISC initiatives, tools, and resources and then communicating that information back to their state colleagues through their professional network. Join us during this first meeting, learn how to become a collaborative member and meet our newly appointed state leaders as they share the status of their senior centers during the pandemic and promising practices found within their state.
Agenda and Speakers

Elizabeth Bernat

Maureen O'Leary

Beverly Ferry

Laura Hoberg

Jose Miranda

Laura Cisneros

Kim Phillips

Anahita Feltz

Bill Pierce

Peter Thompson

Deanna Jones

Jennifer Bennett

Susan Dillon

Mayor Pat Branson

Sue Getman

Center for Benefits Access Plenary Sessions - 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

BEC/SNAP Technology + Reporting / Using BenefitsCheckUp at Work 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

BEC/SNAP Technology + Reporting / Using BenefitsCheckUp at Work

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Overview

A Demonstration and Discussion:

Benefits Enrollment Centers and SNAP grantees are encouraged to attend this session to get answers to common questions about NCOA reporting requirements, get a firsthand demonstration of a new reporting tool (WizeHive), and discover important changes coming to BenefitsCheckUp.

Agenda and Speakers

Abby Pound
Erin Kee McGovern

MIPPA State Grantees Learning & Networking 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

MIPPA State Grantees Learning & Networking

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Overview

The MIPPA network has seen rapid changes over the past few years, with many new directors taking the helm. Join us for an opportunity to meet (virtually) your Center for Benefits staff leads and project officers from the Office of Health Insurance Counseling at ACL; discover developments in store related to TA, training, and reporting/performance measures; and participate in an interactive getting to know you exercise.


Agenda and Speakers

Ann Kayrish

Leslie Fried

Center for Health Aging Special Report - 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Center for Healthy Aging Special Report 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Falls Free National Action Plan: Update on Progress and Priorities for the Future

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Overview

In 2015, the Falls Free® National Falls Prevention Action Plan was developed as part of the White House Conference on Aging, in partnership with multiple stakeholders from across the U.S. Since that time tremendous progress have been made in achieving the goals and implementing strategies and action steps of the National Action Plan. In addition, much has occurred from a policy perspective, including the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging falls prevention report and hearing in 2019. This session will provide highlights of research, programmatic and policy progress over the past 5 years and look ahead to priority areas for falls prevention in the coming years.
Agenda and Speakers

Kathleen Cameron

Samantha Koehler

Ann Dellinger

Ellen Schneider

Emily Nabors

Jon Pynoos

Sarah Khasawinah

National Institute of Senior Centers Session 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

National Institute of Senior Centers Session 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Senior Centers Response to the Pandemic

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Overview

The National Institute of Senior Centers (NISC) Executive Committee has held multiple conversations with senior center professionals to gather feedback during the ever-changing landscape of the COVID-19 pandemic. Join this live session to discuss what we’ve learned and where we are going. NISC leaders will start the conversation and engage participants to share their thoughts on the next steps in reopening for on-site engagement and what they can do now to sustain senior centers. We’ll explore steps your senior center can take to strengthen your brand and community presence in the age of Covid19 and best practices for engaging your donors during the Covid19 crisis. Join us for this timely conversation and bring your ideas to promote engagement, wellness and sustainability of senior centers.
Agenda and Speakers

Maureen O'Leary

Elizabeth Bernat

Tracey Colagrossi

Jill Hall

Beverly Ferry

Malia Fox

Scott Harlow

Laura Cisneros

Barrie Atkin

Mayor Pat Branson

Lynn Fields Harris

Center for Benefits Access Session - 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Center for Benefits Access Session 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Why We're Here: MIPPA Today and Tomorrow

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Overview

This session will bring together the full network of MIPPA state grantees, Benefits Enrollment Centers, and Senior SNAP grantees to meet one another virtually, discover how COVID-19 has affected our current work, and learn up-to-date developments on MIPPA funding and how you can educate policymakers about your work.
Agenda and Speakers

Brandy Bauer

Leslie Fried

Center for Benefits Access Breakout Session - 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Center for Benefits Access Breakout Session Session 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Advances in Research from National Council on Aging

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Overview

Get the lowdown on recent research our Center for Benefits Access team has supported that looks at: estimates of the number of people missing out on LIS & MSP; knowledge of integrated care models for dually eligible individuals among the aging/disability network; how access to benefits affects well-being; and outreach & messaging to diverse elders. 
Agenda and Speakers

Susan Silberman

Jenna McDavid

National Institute of Senior Centers Breakout Session - 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

National Institute of Senior Centers Breakout Session 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

National Institute of Senior Centers Roundtable Session

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Overview

Join NISC members as they present 5 mini sessions related to your senior center operations. These mini sessions are meant to inspire sharing of related programming and discussion of related issues. The five sessions include: • Lessons Learned: Enhancing Behavioral Health Competencies for Senior Center Professionals – Learn about the 19-hour Behavioral Health and Aging certificate program for senior center professionals. Rita Anne Marsh • Reap Rewards with Self Directed Teams – employ this capacity building innovation in your organizations to expand capacity. Christine Beatty • Masters in Aging: Empowering Older Adults and Building Community Connections – See how the Winona Friendship Centers is providing an opportunity to learn documentary filmmaking – from how to use equipment and software to interview individuals and film production. Malia Fox • Influencing the influencers – Learn how to communicate the value of your senior center and connect to your community influencers. – Beverly Ferry • Zoom Virtual Programming Tallahassee Senior Center staff will describe their journey to developing and implementing online programming during the pandemic. – Hella Spellman – missing info Attendees are encouraged to share related program ideas and challenges and solutions related to the topic areas of behavioral health, volunteers, arts, marketing and virtual programs. The full workshop sessions of most presentations will be available during the conference.
Agenda and Speakers

Maureen O'Leary

Scott Harlow

Rita Marsh

Christine Beatty

Malia Fox

Beverly Ferry

Hella Spellman

Jenna McDavid

Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Addressing the Social Determinants of Health Through Tech Platform Collaborations:
Opportunities and Challenges 2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Addressing the Social Determinants of Health Through Tech Platform Collaborations: Opportunities and Challenges

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Overview

According to a 2019 survey by the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging’s (n4a) Aging and Disability Business Institute, there has been a significant increase in the number of community-based organizations contracting with health care systems. These contracts allow for increase integration of social services into the health care delivery system to improve health and address the social determinants of health. Care coordination, case management, evidence-based programs, nutrition services, housing supports, and transportation are only a few of the services which community organizations can successfully provide. In recent years, several software and other technology platforms have been developed that hold promise is helping to connect health care systems and community through shared communication platforms and closed loop referral systems. Platforms like those developed by Unite Us, Aunt Bertha, NowPow, Signify, and many others can be integrated into the electronic medical record and can send direct referrals to community-based organizations. Successful integration of these platforms, however, requires that they community organizations they refer to have sufficient capacity and resource to delivery the promised programs and services. In this presentation, community-based organizations, evidence-based program administrators, and a health care representative will present an overview of what these technologies can do, the potential benefits of collaboration, current examples of such collaboration, and challenges related to sustainability. The target audience for this presentation are community-based organization directors and leadership and others whose role involves addressing the social determinants of health. By attending this presentation, audience members will gain an understanding of the current landscape related to software platforms, how to identify opportunities for collaboration, and how to address challenges related to supporting program delivery.

Agenda and Speakers

Peggy Haynes

Jennifer Raymond

June Simmons

Two-Tiered Approach to an Integrated Statewide Network to Deliver Evidence-Based
Programming 2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Two-Tiered Approach to an Integrated Statewide Network to Deliver Evidence-Based Programming

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Overview

The MA4 Network, developed in 2018 with support from the Administration of Community Living, is a statewide integrated network among the Missouri Area Agencies on Aging. This network delivers coordinated, evidence-based chronic disease self-management programming to residents throughout Missouri with streamlined administration through a control center, the “Network Hub.” The Network Hub is responsible for streamlined administration and financial management, quality oversight, information technology and legal support, training, and contracting with new revenue sources. The regional Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs) throughout the state are responsible for building robust networks of community-based providers to deliver quality programming, monitoring fidelity, and reporting data to the Network Hub. This presentation will explore the two-tiered development of a statewide network: 1. The operational structure required for a high-functioning statewide network to attract investment by health payers, such as health plans. The operational structure explored will include contractual requirements for the AAAs, administrative and financial management workflows, quality assurance strategies, and payer engagement practices developed and implemented by the Network Hub. This portion of the presentation will be delivered by the Project Director of the MA4 Network. 2. A second critical component to a high-functioning statewide network are strong regional networks of CBOs with fidelity monitoring practices and leader support. In this part of the presentation, a local AAA will present their strategies for recruiting and retaining CBO partners. Their approach is built upon their three identified pillars of success: collaboration, contracts and quality standards. This portion of the presentation will be delivered by the AAA Program Coordinator in the Kansas City region who is responsible for building out the regional network of providers and monitoring program delivery. The presentation will explore the challenges in building out a new statewide network including organizational culture barriers in response to new and enhanced quality standards and defined workflows. It will also explore strategies (such as consistent and intentional communication, face-to-face team building, and individual AAA quality assurance assessments) for addressing those barriers. This work exposed all involved to a new territory - healthcare contracting and requirements. It also required all involved, especially Network Hub staff, to make significant investments in learning health care policies, laws and regulation, particularly around the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, and then apply those learnings to function in a community setting. Crucially, these learnings have established leadership disposition and network infrastructure amenable to expanding marketed offerings to wraparound integrated care services. There is a broad target audience for this presentation including AAA or CBO staff, AAA or CBO management staff interested in developing standard processes as a basis for recruiting additional revenue sources, an evidence-based program coordinator interested in expanding relationships with community providers, or a group of organizations interested in building a network to respond to new opportunities emerging from the value-based health payer environment.
Agenda and Speakers

Tane Lewis

Erika Saleski

Backpacking Through Fidelity and Quality Assurance: What You Need to Pack 2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Backpacking Through Fidelity and Quality Assurance: What You Need to Pack

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Overview

Healthy Living for ME (HL4ME) is fast growing statewide network with over 150 leaders who deliver multiple evidence-based programs. Our network had to learn quickly how to manage the fidelity of each program to ensure programs were being implemented with the best measurable outcomes. As our network expanded throughout the state, it became clear that we needed to provide fidelity and quality assurance support to our leaders, volunteers and partners and hired a Training & Fidelity Manager. Our first goal was learning how to keep track of our leader’s certifications, dates of their last class and quality assurance checks. We tracked this through a simplified excel spreadsheet and kept in close contact with the organization and leaders. As our network expanded, we had to learn new solutions to keep informed of 150 leaders. One of our solutions was the purchase of a database. 

During the breakout session, we will discuss how this purchase has worked for us and how we use it to alert us for expiring certifications and up-coming quality assurance checks. Each evidence-based program offered has a different set of outcomes. We will talk about what the basic outcomes and the impact they have for participants. 

Agenda and Speakers

Jennifer Fortin

Wesley Littlefield

Stepping On Falls Prevention Program: Updates and Adaptations 2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Stepping On Falls Prevention Program: Updates and Adaptations

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Overview

Stepping On continues to be one of the premier evidence-based falls prevention programs in the U.S., in large part because it is multi-factorial, focusing on balance and strength exercises, medication reviews, vision reviews and home modifications. Design with adult education principles, behavior change and self-mastery skills, it is endorsed by the CDC because it addresses both fear of falling and the actual risk of falling. Studies have shown it actually reduces falls by over 30%. As Stepping On continues in its second decade in the U.S., with licensees in nearly half of the U.S. states, there are many exciting updates and adaptations being developed. First, the original researchers from Sydney, Australia have updated the curriculum, menu, manual and program and the new version will be rolling out early in 2021. A few of the changes will include decreasing the number of handouts, simplifying activities to increase the fidelity of the program and updating the recommendations, photos and research related to the content. Participants will learn how this CDC-endorsed multi-factorial evidence-based falls prevention program was developed, tested, originally disseminated and this second round of updates that will be released in 2021. Current licensees and those interested in learning more should attend this session to learn about the adaptions and the Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging’s plans for updating current licensees and program Leaders and sharing the adaptations, which include an on-line reinforcement program for Stepping On graduates (“Stepping On-line”), a version for participants with MCI (mild cognitive impairment), a virtual version currently being tested in Virginia and adaptations by an agency in Milwaukee, Wisconsin that is delivering the program to Lao and Hmong elders – a culture without a written language and an oral language that does not even have a word for “balance.” Appropriate for aging network, health care providers, public health, evidence-based health promotion program providers.
Agenda and Speakers

Shannon Myers

Six-Month Benefits from Workplace CDSMP Participation Among Employees with
Chronic Conditions 2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Six-Month Benefits from Workplace CDSMP Participation Among Employees with Chronic Conditions

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Overview

An estimated 60% of adults in the United States have one or more chronic conditions, and over 40% have multiple co-morbidities. This means more and more employees are working with chronic conditions and the associated symptomology, which can detract from their performance and productivity. Given the aging workforce and rising chronic disease prevalence, disease management is gaining importance in workplace health promotion. Despite the known effectiveness of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP), less is known about its adoption and impact in workplace settings. This study reports the effectiveness of the worksite-tailored version of CDSMP (wCDSMP) among employees with one or more chronic conditions. Multiple latent-difference score models with sandwich estimators were fitted to identify changes from baseline to 6-month follow-up. Employees were primarily female (87%), non-Hispanic white (61%), and obese (66%). On average, participants were age 49 (range: 25-80) and self-reported 3.25 chronic conditions (range: 1-16). The most commonly reported conditions were high cholesterol (45%), high blood pressure (45%), anxiety/emotional/mental health condition (26%), and diabetes (25%). Among wCDSMP participants, significant improvements were observed for self-efficacy to manage chronic conditions (uΔ=0.63, P<0.05), stress (uΔ=-1.00, P<0.001), fatigue (uΔ=-1.77, P<0.01), sleep quality (uΔ=0.20, P<0.01), and overall mental health (uΔ=3.11, P<0.01) from baseline to 6-month follow-up. Improvements were also observed for physical activity (uΔ=0.68, P<0.01) and the consumption of fast food (uΔ=-0.43, P<0.01), fruits and vegetables (uΔ=0.44, P<0.01), soda/sugar beverages (uΔ=-0.51, P<0.01), and water (uΔ=0.38, P<0.05). Finally, significant improvements in health interference with job performance (uΔ=-0.16, P<0.05), work limitations due to mental tasks (uΔ=-7.43, P<0.01), and job satisfaction (uΔ=0.21, P<0.05) were also observed from baseline to follow-up. wCDSMP shows great promise to improve health and wellness among employees with chronic conditions, and the modified format (12 one-hour sessions held twice a week for six weeks) can increase uptake in workplace settings.
Agenda and Speakers

Matthew Smith

Questions and Answers with Dr. Kate Lorig about the Self-Management Resource
Center Suite of Programs 2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Questions and Answers with Dr. Kate Lorig about the Self-Management Resource Center Suite of Programs

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Overview

Organizations across the world have implemented, expanded, and sustained evidence-based chronic disease self-management education (CDSME) programs to support the millions of adults living with one or more chronic health conditions. During this session, Dr. Kate Lorig will answer questions from community-based organizations with experience implementing CDSME programs -- including information on the new and improved program, book, implementation, training, and fidelity.
Agenda and Speakers

Kate Lorig
Virginia Gonzales
Kathleen Zuke

Advancing a Statewide Evidence-Based Program Delivery Network 2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Advancing a Statewide Evidence-Based Program Delivery Network

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Overview

Presentation Goal: Individuals who attend this session will walk out with key strategies to set up a statewide delivery system for evidence-based health promotion programs. 

We will discuss strategies including: engaging diverse partners; identifying and implementing technology needs; creating an infrastructure for conducting trainings, managing leaders, monitoring/facilitating program fidelity; and creating a value proposition to present to potential payers. Two Administration on Community Living (ACL) grantees, AgeOptions in Illinois and the National Kidney Foundation of Michigan (NKFM), will share how we have applied these strategies to successfully manage statewide network hubs and collaborate with unique payer sources. During this presentation, AgeOptions and the NKFM will discuss our process for developing a statewide delivery system for Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME) and falls prevention programs. Taking risks in contracting with new partners has improved our negotiation skills and broadened the possibility of new partnerships in different arenas. This work has helped both organizations to grow staffing capacity, changed the way we communicate the value-add of these programs, and expanded our reach. 

Agenda and Speakers

Jodi Burke

Kathryn Zahm

Your Role in Opportunities for Healthy Aging Policy in 2020 and Beyond 2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Your Role in Opportunities for Healthy Aging Policy in 2020 and Beyond

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Overview

This session is designed for Administration for Community Living falls prevention and Chronic Disease Self-Management Education grantees and other partners to learn how they can make a difference in healthy aging policy in 2020 and beyond. We're currently in the middle of a significant election year, when little legislating occurs in the Nation's Capital. Nevertheless, there are some unique policy opportunities for evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention programs this year, and there is important work to be done to set the stage for a new Congress in Medicare, Medicaid, the Older Americans Act, and other programs. A particular focus will be on the openings for policy change provided by the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging 2019 report, "Falls Prevention: National, State, and Local Solutions to Better Support Seniors." Given that the report highlighted solutions at the national and community levels, we all have a role to play to enlist policymakers in the next steps that will make these solutions reality. The broad support of the recommendations by the Committee members also demonstrates the impact that everyone can have on shaping policy. Learn how developing relationships with elected officials and educating them about the daily work you do with older adults can help shape the debates on healthy aging policy and FY2021 funding priorities this year, and lay the groundwork for opportunities for evidence-based programs and health care policy going forward.
Agenda and Speakers

Howard Bedlin

Kathleen Cameron

Jeremiah McCoy

Marci Phillips

Center for Healthy Aging Concurrent Breakout Sessions - 3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Newly Approved Evidence-Based Programs to Help Expand Your Programming and Reach 3:30 - 4:30 p.m.

Newly Approved Evidence-Based Programs to Help Expand Your Programming and Reach

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Overview

Evidence-based programs (EBPs) offer proven ways to promote health and prevent disease among older adults. Several new programs addressing various health topics recently have been approved to meet the Administration for Community Living’s (ACL’s) criteria for being evidence-based. These approved programs are eligible for Older Americans Act Title III-D and other defined ACL funding. This session will briefly discuss the EBP review process and the importance of evidence-based programs to the aging services network. We will highlight the evidence-based programs that have been recently approved, including Respecting Choices, ¡Sí, Yo Puedo Controlar Mí Diabetes! (¡Sí, Yo Puedo!), Health Matters, and Tai Chi Prime. A member of the Evidence-Based Leadership Collaborative (EBLC) will describe EBLC's role in providing support and technical assistance to evidence-based program applicants. Time will be allowed for discussion and interaction with the panelists.
Agenda and Speakers

Ellen Schneider
Kathleen Ziemba
Shannon Myers
Lesley Steinman

Take Action Now: How to Identify and Reduce Social Isolation in Older Adults 3:30 - 4:30 p.m.

Take Action Now: How to Identify and Reduce Social Isolation in Older Adults

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Overview

An online Social Isolation Risk Screener is assisting individuals, clinicians, and community providers to assess potential risk of social isolation among older adults. The Screener uses algorithms to identify risk and provide tailored recommendations for resources, services, and programs to assist older adults be less isolated. Maryland is tracking how providers and staff recognize risk among older adults. Screened individuals will receive follow-up 3 to 6 months later to evaluate changes in individual risk after being linked to services. Providers are referring at risk individuals, via Maryland's Health Information Exchange (HIE), to the Maryland Living Well Center of Excellence where they are connected to programs and services. Utilization of healthcare services and physician visits are tracked, as well as individual changes in social connectedness activities. Evidence-based program coordinators and senior center directors will learn how to access and utilize the Screener and connect to resources to reduce isolation.
Agenda and Speakers

Leigh Ann Eagle

Sue Lachenmayr

Matthew Smith

Adapting Evidence-Based Programs to Reach Diverse Populations 3:30 - 4:30 p.m.

Adapting Evidence-Based Programs to Reach Diverse Populations

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Overview

More and more community-based organizations are successfully delivering evidence-based programs (EBPs) to address chronic disease, falls, behavioral health and caregiver challenges in the communities they serve. The number of individuals who benefit from these programs continues to grow, particularly with increased integrations of CBO services into health care delivery systems. Challenges remain, however, in implementing these programs in settings or populations that differ from those the program was originally developed to reach. Without confronting these challenges, the reach of evidence-based programs and the individuals who benefit from them may be limited. One strategy for overcoming these challenges and accelerating access to more diverse populations is through program adaptation. Adaptation is the process of making changes to an evidence-based program, in partnership with the program developers, so that the program is more suitable for a particular population or setting while not compromising program fidelity or outcomes. In this presentation, program administrations and members of the Evidence-Based Leadership Collaborative will share examples of established rapid adaptation frameworks which may be utilized to structure pilots and assess adaptation efficacy. Examples of both successful adaptation as well as adaptations under pilot will be discussed. 
Agenda and Speakers

Paige Denison

Jennifer Raymond

Beyond Implementation: Using the Program Sustainability Tool to Assess and Plan for
Sustainability 3:30 - 4:30 p.m.

Beyond Implementation: Using the Program Sustainability Tool to Assess and Plan for Sustainability

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Overview

Public health programs can deliver benefits only if organizations are able to sustain programs over time. The evidence base in how to implement and disseminate health programs is growing. However, little attention has been paid to what happens to programs once they have been implemented. Sustaining programs is often challenging due to rapid changes in budgetary and political climates. To ensure ongoing implementation of these programs, stakeholders need to understand the factors that contribute to program sustainability and look beyond just funding. With knowledge of the critical factors associated with sustainability, programs can develop a plan to build sustainability so they can operate more efficiently and improve their ability to offer benefits to the public over the long term. Although numerous frameworks of sustainability have been developed, almost no assessment tools that have been developed. This presentation will describe the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool (PSAT), an instrument for assessing the capacity for program sustainability, as a simple, user-friendly tool that can be used in multiple settings. 
Agenda and Speakers

Celsa Bowman

Hayoung Kye

Emily McDonald

Jennifer Tripken

Updates from the CDC's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control 3:30 - 4:30 p.m.

Updates from the CDC's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control

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Overview

Join staff from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control for updates on CDC's efforts related to falls prevention research, STEADI (Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries) outreach, traumatic brain injury, and opioid overdose prevention. Strategies on using various CDC tools and resources for your older adult population will be presented and discussed. 
Agenda and Speakers

Kathleen Cameron
Ann Dellinger

Addressing Ageism as a Barrier to Participation in Evidence-Based Health Promotion Programs 3:30 - 4:30 p.m.

Addressing Ageism as a Barrier to Participation in Evidence-Based Health Promotion Programs

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Overview

From the moment we are born until (if lucky enough) we get to be old ourselves, we’re bombarded with negative associations with aging – in our language, advertising, entertainment, greeting cards, Facebook, media, health care, employment, research studies, “jokes,” and because we’ve all internalized it so much, every time we look in the mirror. So what? So researchers, led by Dr. Becca Levy, Yale School of Public Health, have conducted longitudinal studies that have concluded that individuals with negative associations with aging (think: decrepit, demented, out to pasture, sad, useless, unattractive, decaying body parts, untrainable, stubborn) as opposed to the positive ones (contentment, freedom, accomplishment, experience, giving back, satisfaction, relaxation, adventure) have life expectancies that are 7.5 years LESS than those with positive associations with aging. Conversely, those who think positively about aging have lower rates of memory loss and dementia, are 44% more likely to recover from a disability, are more likely to engage in preventive behaviors (e.g., wear seat belts, get flu shots), ask physicians about health issues, watch their weight and diet). Obviously, the more negatively a person thinks about aging and holds a “why bother? It’s all downhill from here” attitude, the less likely she or he is to participate in a health promotion workshop. We’ll also look at the four types of ageism in health care: (1) elderspeak (e.g., baby talk, infantilizing older adults); (2) undertreatment (“why bother doing this test, surgery, etc. – she doesn’t have that long to live anyway …”; (3) overtreatment (he’s got a Medicare card and won’t have to pay, so let’s order up useless futile tests and treatments….); and (4) “elder profiling” (assuming all older adults have dementia so engaging in conversations and decision-making only with their adult children. In this session participants will learn how to flip the script, start a campaign against ageism, call it out when you see it (being mindful to “enlighten, not shame”), and begin to address this most insidious “ism.” Change begins with ourselves so we’ll evaluate our own internalized ageism and the aging programs we provide. Then we’ll learn about resources and strategies to combat the Ageism of other individuals, health care systems and other institutions. Ageism is a public health issue and there are is no better group of individuals to champion this cause than the aging network. By doing so, we’ll have a double reward: 7.5 more years of life for ourselves AND changing the world for our current clients and participants – and their children and grandchildren too.
Agenda and Speakers

Betsy Abramson

Remembering When: A Safety Concept Worth Remembering Including Tools to Help
Seniors Age in Place 3:30 - 4:30 p.m.

Remembering When: A Safety Concept Worth Remembering Including Tools to Help Seniors Age in Place

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Overview

A robust fire and Fall prevention program can help adults age in place. Aging professionals in North Carolina, working alongside a strong Falls Prevention Coalition and vibrant fire and falls prevention program, will highlight successes in their community. For the last five years, the multidisciplinary team in Greenville, NC, has used the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) Remembering When program to implement an evidence-based fire and falls prevention curriculum paired with community based resources. Remembering When teaches/reviews 16 key fire and falls prevention messages through a fun trivia game and reinforces those messages with home safety checks. This session will equip attendees with the tools to offer effective, evidence-based fall prevention programs and to choose one that is appropriate for the older adults in your community by looking at your data to customize your fire and fall program. Discussion will also include national, state and local resources, and how to harness, support, and sustain those resources to advance your prevention program for aging adults.
Agenda and Speakers

LaTangee Dickens

Mary Hall

Rebekah Thurston

Kelly Ransdell

National Institute of Senior Centers Breakout Session 3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

National Institute of Senior Centers Breakout Session 3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

National Institute of Senior Centers Public Policy Panel Update

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Overview

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed how we all help and empower older adults, even related to advocacy on their behalf. Advocacy can take many forms, and it doesn’t just mean lobbying. Education of policymakers about the needs of the older adults you serve and the public funding and programs you rely on for your mission, makes all of you advocates. Join this session for a conversation about how the primary concerns of older adults and how you address them have shifted during the pandemic. Building relationships with policymakers is essential for the success of your organization, and improving the lives of older adults you serve. Candidates know that older adults vote, so they're seeking opportunities to make their cases Don’t miss an opportunity to leverage this unique access to your advantage. In this session, the NCOA Public Policy & Advocacy team will not only share strategies for being a more effective advocate in your community but also will expand on the policy priorities and tips provided in the Election 2020 Advocacy Toolkit deployed earlier this year. In addition, your colleagues from the aging network will share how they’ve made the most of these engagements with candidates and member.
Agenda and Speakers

Sue Getman

Marci Phillips

Mayor Pat Branson

Laura Cisneros

Lynn Fields Harris

25 Years of Impact: Honoring Jim Firman - 5:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

25 Years of Impact: Honoring Jim Firman 5:00 - 5:30 p.m.

25 Years of Impact: Honoring Jim Firman

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Overview

Join us as we say thank you and farewell to Jim Firman, NCOA’s President & CEO since 1995, who is graduating to his next phase as a national thought leader and advocate for older Americans.